SuperMoto Junkie banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After watching videos of 80's Superbiker I had to build one for the street. Really just as an exhibition bike with a show quality build. Most of the early bikes were 500cc two strokes raced wide open at 120mph+. Motocross, flat track and road race, the birth of supermoto.

I got a 1989 CR500 frame with a street legal title, score! then I got a complete 2001 CR500 with a California green sticker. The plan was to use the '89 frame, subframe, airbox, seat and tank and the '01 engine, swingarm and forks (lower stem bearing swap and they bolt up). Finally, I was going to dress it out as a 1987 CR500, blue seat, yellow plates and gold wheels!

I thought I was one of the clever few that could spawn a new CA street legal two stroke. However, the Socialist state of California proved me wrong. I swapped all the parts from the '01 to the '89 frame and tried a simple out of state transfer. California requires a V.I.N. inspection for ALL out of state transfers. So I brought the bike down for the inspection. The V.I.N was fine but the bike still needed a 50 state smog label and a Federal Safety label. Believe it or not the 1989 CR500 passes the C.A.R.B. requirements! However, I got hung up on the Federal Safety sticker. It doesn't exist because the bike was made for closed course competition use. My only remaining options were risking future revocation of its street legal status. Sadly, I was defeated.

With still wanting to replicate an old race bike I searched for a new victim. Since engine swaps are still legal (including swapping in a two stroke) I thought about a CR500 in a XL or XR frame but required too much frame work and wouldn't have the result I wanted. The other CA street legal option is any bike 1977 or older can be made street legal but its just a couple years too old. Looked at YZ465 and YZ490 but would be the same problem as the CR500.




And then it happened....I stumbled across this

2002 YZ250 with a E-line stator, a WR transmission and most important of all, a California street legal title! Also, it was titled before the law changed so its a permanent plate and cannot be revoked!



Rode it for a couple days before starting the build. Since its too new to make it look like a 80's bike I decided to do a modern version. So I'll be putting on all the 2015 plastics, airbox and graphics with a 17" out back and a 19" up front.

All torn down, fully committed now!




Powder coated the frame and triples. Went gloss black on the frame and tried to replicate the factory finish on new YZ triple clamps








Going to lace up new rims to the stock hubs next
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
848 Posts
After watching videos of 80's Superbiker I had to build one for the street. Really just as an exhibition bike with a show quality build. Most of the early bikes were 500cc two strokes raced wide open at 120mph+. Motocross, flat track and road race, the birth of supermoto.

I got a 1989 CR500 frame with a street legal title, score! then I got a complete 2001 CR500 with a California green sticker. The plan was to use the '89 frame, subframe, airbox, seat and tank and the '01 engine, swingarm and forks (lower stem bearing swap and they bolt up). Finally, I was going to dress it out as a 1987 CR500, blue seat, yellow plates and gold wheels!

I thought I was one of the clever few that could spawn a new CA street legal two stroke. However, the Socialist state of California proved me wrong. I swapped all the parts from the '01 to the '89 frame and tried a simple out of state transfer. California requires a V.I.N. inspection for ALL out of state transfers. So I brought the bike down for the inspection. The V.I.N was fine but the bike still needed a 50 state smog label and a Federal Safety label. Believe it or not the 1989 CR500 passes the C.A.R.B. requirements! However, I got hung up on the Federal Safety sticker. It doesn't exist because the bike was made for closed course competition use. My only remaining options were risking future revocation of its street legal status. Sadly, I was defeated.

With still wanting to replicate an old race bike I searched for a new victim. Since engine swaps are still legal (including swapping in a two stroke) I thought about a CR500 in a XL or XR frame but required too much frame work and wouldn't have the result I wanted. The other CA street legal option is any bike 1977 or older can be made street legal but its just a couple years too old. Looked at YZ465 and YZ490 but would be the same problem as the CR500.




And then it happened....I stumbled across this

2002 YZ250 with a E-line stator, a WR transmission and most important of all, a California street legal title! Also, it was titled before the law changed so its a permanent plate and cannot be revoked!



Rode it for a couple days before starting the build. Since its too new to make it look like a 80's bike I decided to do a modern version. So I'll be putting on all the 2015 plastics, airbox and graphics with a 17" out back and a 19" up front.

All torn down, fully committed now!




Powder coated the frame and triples. Went gloss black on the frame and tried to replicate the factory finish on new YZ triple clamps








Going to lace up new rims to the stock hubs next
I loved the superbiker series on abc- Danny "magoo" Chandler, Jay Springsteen, Ricky Graham and Steve Wise are the pioneers of supermoto.
I remember riding my bmx bike back in the day with a playing card in the spokes trying to be like one of them.
Those 480 air cooled honda's would flat haul the mail- loved seeing them go back and forth against the harley xr750's.
Man those guys looked so out of control and balls to the wall- no doubt todays bike are engineered to be much faster with 10x the handling but those guys looked way faster than the racers we have today.

Subd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,523 Posts
how about some pics of the 500 :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,293 Posts
I've heard of people making their own stickers and having success with it. I'd consider trying that. Or a different DMV, some may be willing to give you a plate without the safety sticker - every employee is different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Seems like a lot of people think old bikes weren't fast! After riding a few its clear that old 490's and 500's were TOO fast so they stopped making and racing them! Guess manufactures wanted to keep their customers alive to buy next years bike.


Sadly, I sold the CR500. Ended up putting the complete 2001 back together and sold that, Sold the '89 frame separate.

When I got the 500 it had the Service Honda lighting stator and CDI. It also had the stock set up, so I threw the stock stator back in and kept the Service Honda one for the future. I will have my CA plated 500 some day.

I thought about printing labels or going back to the DMV until someone accepted it, but was going to throw tons of cash at the bike making it a road only machine. If the street title was revoked it would all be pointless.

Here's a shot of the build and the finished CR500 just before I sold it.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,523 Posts
the old girl was lovely , very nice restoring job

here is my 500 build i just finished

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Awesome job! Great looking bike, now I really wish I didn't sell mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
So now that I'm finally started in on this project I can hardly wait to ride it!

Got everything I need to build my wheels.


Warp 9 rims, 19x2.5 front and 17x3.5 rear

Buchanan spoke sets

All Balls front and rear wheel bearings

Avon Trailrider tires, 110/80-19 front and 140/80-17 rear



I know my rim selection is a bit unconventional for a road only set up but I love the look of the bigger front wheel. The cornering power might be less than optimal but it will be plenty for a mere mortal such as myself.

Avon claims the new Trailrider has a better compound for the slab than the Distanzias did (not sure about the supermoto compound). Never rode Distanzias so I wont be able to report back.


All set up and ready to rock!




Bead blasted the hubs and ready to install new bearings.




Front wheel done!




Now for the rear








All done! Can't wait to see them on the bike!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,523 Posts
19 front very strange all the racers here use 16 inch fronts now , sounds like more of a dirt track set up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,293 Posts
Similar sizing to something like a V Strom.

Are racers really using a 16 now? I know 16.5 was common for a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Its a popular adventure bike set up. Some new KTM's come set up like that too.

A modern Superbiker is my theme for the build. Same basic recipe its always been. Take a motocross bike, upgrade the brakes, smaller front wheel and you're racing!

I'm also using this for the street and not the track so again my rim selection was based off the original Superbikers running a 19 front. In the original series put on by ABC there was a good portion of flat track.

I've also seen guys drag knee with true Bigfoot/Sportsman set ups (21,18), and I'm not one of those guys! My XR650R has TKC80's on it with 21/18 rims and I have more fun on that thing than should be legal, front will wash out if I push it too hard. I can only guess the 19/17 on the YZ would corner even better and that's enough for me!


Its one of the few things that make my build unique. I plan on riding it through town like its a BMX bike and the 19 should be better for stairs, dirt paths and such.

I also thought 16.5 was the racers set up. A balance between stability and control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
ALL balls steering set showed up, time to actually start putting the bike together.



First I ran a tap through all the threaded holes in the frame and the triples.



Looks like the factory doesn't mask the race seats, not sure why I thought they would! I left the old ones in (obviously) when I had it coated to protect the surface and so I didn't have to scrape it clean in case of shoddy tape work.



SO happy the press tool I made for the fork conversion on my XRR worked for this too. It really justifies making a tool when you need it again!

Everything went great except I didn't pack the bearing like a sucker! I actually got it done from the small end of the cage but what a pain in the ass.



Very happy with the finish on both parts!






And my EBC Supermoto kit showed up, waiting for the rear and fasteners for both.


Just need a few other parts and I'll have everything I need to put it all together!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Got the rear rotor finally, first one I ordered was wrongish

This is the rotor I ordered and the one I wanted EBC MD6190C




But this is the one that showed up TWICE!




BOTH are EBC part #MD6190C!

Ordered one from ebay and it was different than the picture and I kinda figured eh, ebay. So sent it back and called EBC, they said to use Dennis Kirk so I did. That one shows up and it's the same!

I guess they changed the design but why didn't the guy at EBC know that?

So now I'm looking for and old stock of MD6190C, started making calls to see if people will take it out of the package and send me a pic first.

The guys at Dennis Kirk were really cool and looked but only one they had in stock was a teardrop one. Called Motosport, they're gonna see if they can they can take a look.

Anybody have any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
So with all the rear disc suggestions that came pouring in I decided to go with the Moto Master Nitro rear rotor. Its the best match I could find for my EBC front kit.

And I was busy this weekend! Thoroughly cleaned all the suspension components and the engine.

Forks were pretty easy, cleaner and a wire brush for the caps and axle lugs. The swing arm needed much more love. Tons of cleaning, removed all the decals and tons of silicone from an old swing arm mounted kickstand. Hit the box sections with 120 sandpaper keeping my direction lengthwise, then 220 and finished up with Scotch Brite pads. Doused it with clear coat and she's ready to install. Took the shock apart, cleaned it, painted the spring and back together.






The engine wasn't too bad, cleaner, wire brush, cleaner, Scotch Brite, wire brush and rinse! I'll go through the engine when it needs it. It only has 6 hrs on the current top end and it runs killer.







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I opened up the big box of Yamaha parts!

2015 seat, radiator shrouds, fenders, airbox and side covers. Also got the 2015 factory graphics and factory fasteners. Not the cheapest option but it sure is sweet opening individual bags of fasteners with Yamaha printed on them!

Started looking at it and figured I'd make sure it all fits.




Ditched the lame Robocop fork guards and went with Light Speed "CR" style guards. Huge improvement on looks and now I can route the brake hose around the fork instead of underneath. Little trimming for the oversized rotor and they fit great!





Before and after!



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
That kit looks good, looks like my 2012 YZ450!

UFO also makes a restyle kit but I wanted to try and make it look like a new YZ250 and figured factory plastics would give me that look.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top