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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a friend looking at getting his first bike (hes ridden my old xr100 a handfull of times) and i think I have him convinced to get a dualsport instead of killing himself or a 600 sportbike.

I found a 2001 WR250f that is already street legal for $1800 that i think would be the perfect bike, at a decent price.

Ive looked around and found everything from valves and oil every 6 hours, to valves every 1000 miles with oil every 3000 (with claims that the valves will almost never move). What type of maintenance schedule would you use for a more "relaxed" street ridden bike? How difficult is the valve adjustment on these bikes? If it requires pulling the cams its probably a no-go for him, as hes not the most mechanically savy person.

Enough people ride WR450 that I have to imagine the 250 cant be too bad.

Any insight is greatly appreciated.
 

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On the WR250F, to do a Valve ajustment you will need to remove the Cams. The shims are under the buckets. Overall she is a great bike and very fast. But keep in mind, to use this bike as a street bike she will need much more maintenace then the WRX. The WR250F is no play Bike. There are times I wish to have that engine in my X :D
 

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I've got a registered and plated 2009 WR-250F.

First, unless the guy only wants to putter around on the street, I'd skip that bike for street use because it's a 5-speed (vs. 6-speed), comes geared low, and, unless you gear it to the moon, won't feel all that great trying to run with high-speed traffic.
It's not really a street bike the way it comes, in other words.
Excellent dirt bike, though, where the terrain makes doing 50mph seem like you're doing 120. :)

That 2001 model is kickstart only, too.
No problem unless he hates kickstarting.

The maintenance will very much depend on how the bike gets used.
If the guy were truly just puttering around on the street, I wouldn't doubt the guy would have to do very little to it in a season.
Personally, I'd be more concerned with the newbie buying a 10-year-old off-road bike that may have been ridden hard and put away wet, then finding out the hard way the bike is pretty worn out.

The valves use the typical shim under bucket actuation, and if an actual adjustment is needed, yes, the camshafts come out for that because the adjustment shims are under neath them.
For a mere measurement check, no need to remove the camshafts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The more research I did on it the more I started to think he wouldn't like it. I definitely see him as a more "get on and go" type rider than one that likes to tinker around/mod/do maintenance (I dont think he's ever changed the oil in a car before).

Thanks for the input.
 
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