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Hi guys, I guess this is the right area to ask. Lately I've been playing around with trying to wheelie my duke II. I can get it to pop up in 2nd gear with the clutch but it seems like I have to be really harsh. When it does come up I can't keep it up, it just drops. Looking for tips please :)

I've been assured the duke is good for wheelies but I just can't see it? Maybe it's just me.

Thanks, Rob.
 

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Hi guys, I guess this is the right area to ask. Lately I've been playing around with trying to wheelie my duke II. I can get it to pop up in 2nd gear with the clutch but it seems like I have to be really harsh. When it does come up I can't keep it up, it just drops. Looking for tips please :)

I've been assured the duke is good for wheelies but I just can't see it? Maybe it's just me.

Thanks, Rob.

Just keep in mind. I've been riding bikes for 31 years and riding multi gear wheelies for 10 years.
http://www.supermotojunkie.com/showthread.php?t=49450&highlight=sunday+ride+oops
 

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what you think is harsh on the clutch may not be at all. it sounds like the fron is not coming up far enough. keep doing what you are doing but give her a little more until you can keep the wheel up. sit back on the seat one inch. that will help. make sure you cover the rear brake. i can ride a decent wheelie and i sometimes will hit the rear brake in a wheelie just to practice. so when the time comes it is second nature. that millisecond between thinking about hitting the brake and your natural reaction to do so can make the diffrenece between you ass on the pavement or having to change your underwear. just practice and baby steps is the key.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1NomgHdiHc this is a second threw 5th.
 

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I have another question. Im still just trying to hold a single gear wheelie on my 610. I havent tried clutching it yet cause I feel like im going to get thrown off lol. Anyways heres my question do you guys keep the top half of your body perpendicular to the ground or are you leaning back at a slight angle? Also do you guys throw your weight back or let the bike do all the work?
 

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I have another question. Im still just trying to hold a single gear wheelie on my 610. I havent tried clutching it yet cause I feel like im going to get thrown off lol. Anyways heres my question do you guys keep the top half of your body perpendicular to the ground or are you leaning back at a slight angle? Also do you guys throw your weight back or let the bike do all the work?
its all in how YOU want to do it.. and only a little dependant on the bike.
on some bikes, i lean forward into it because it comes up far too fast with just the throttle... on other bikes, i stand a bit and lean back so it can come up easier...

personally, i perfer the throttle chop and i dont like using the clutch at all....
if you lean back, then the bike doesnt have to be up as far... and visaversa... its so dependant upon how you want to do it that i doubt anyone here can tell you.. just whatever you do, do it slowly. one step at a time. dont try sitting back AND clutching it harder.. etc....

if the front doesnt want to stay up.. you're not balanced enough yet.. either lift the wheel higher, or lean back more.
 

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to get a feel for clutching it up...accelerate pretty hard but not full out and grab and release(read-one finger slip it) the clutch and youll feell the bike want to come up nicely...because you are already accelerating its not going to loop out (generally) and gives you an idea of feeling...

make sense?
 

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Yea Shortburb I get what your saying i'll try that. I have only been riding for a few weeks now so I'll work on my balance for now. Off to practice... maybe try some hills to I hear that helps.
 

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Hi guys, I guess this is the right area to ask. Lately I've been playing around with trying to wheelie my duke II. I can get it to pop up in 2nd gear with the clutch but it seems like I have to be really harsh. When it does come up I can't keep it up, it just drops. Looking for tips please :)

I've been assured the duke is good for wheelies but I just can't see it? Maybe it's just me.

Thanks, Rob.
Is the bike jetted? The Duke is one of the most ridiculously easy to wheelie bikes ever. Just short shift into second, dip the throttle and crack it back open. I always had more trouble trying not to wheelie over backwards on my Duke than I ever had trying to get it up. The motor is the definition of torquey.
 

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Is the bike jetted? The Duke is one of the most ridiculously easy to wheelie bikes ever. Just short shift into second, dip the throttle and crack it back open. I always had more trouble trying not to wheelie over backwards on my Duke than I ever had trying to get it up. The motor is the definition of torquey.
thats a throttle chop.. you close it quick, the frontend loads, then wack it open and not only does the engine pull, but the spring pops it up and you get even more weight transfer...
thats how i get my other bikes up... from 50s to ducatis, it seems to work good, and in my personal opinion, its alot easier to control then clutching it. there are those who disagree completely with that, but its just what i prefer. im no expert by any means...

if i was trying to teach a noob to wheelie... thats what id tell them to try first.. but... uhh... if you've only been riding a few weeks, id wait on the wheelies altogether.
 

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like several have said, HOW you wheelie is a personal preference, although theres some similarities and "standards" through all wheelies...

as mentioned...

theres a balance point, which is where your RPM's stop increasing.

theres what i call a "breakover point"... this is the point where its easier for your bike to overcome gravity... about 1/3 or half way up the "clock" to the balance point.

you can control both of these with your body position.

The further you lean foward, the higher the breakover point is, and the higher the balance point is.

The further you lean back, or sit back, the lower both of these points are.

Its a little different with a 12 bar, but not really.

Clutch it up, power it up, bounce it up, or use the rear brake to preload the suspension while you clutch or power it up... all does the same thing, it gets you in the air.

What you need to do, over and over and over, is practice one method of getting wheel in the air.... FORGET riding the wheelie out very far. Just practice the method you like to get the front up. OVER AND OVER AND OVER.

More importantly, do it at a constant speed.

So, you wheelie, say, at 10mph, and you set it down at 30... SLOW BACK DOWN TO 10mph, and try again. Use the rear brake to slow yourself down. This makes a mental link between speed and braking in your brain before you ever try to hit the brake in the middle of the wheelie.

Let me repeat that again. EVERY TIME YOU TRY A WHEELIE, SLOW BACK DOWN and try it again at the same speed. Don't keep speeding up. Then you learn nothing - you have no idea how hard to throttle / clutch it up at 10, and then you try at 30, and again at 50.... well, each speed is going to require a different amount of throttle or clutch, so keep doing it at the same speed. Once you master that, it will carry over to the other speeds more easily!

personally, i use EVERY method to launch a wheelie, but it depends on the bike, speed, and location.

For slow wheelies, that i want to consistently launch to the exact same height over and over and over, i use the clutch. On a light supermoto, you dont need much clutch or RPM's... just a little.

If i'm going around a corner and want to wheelie out of it, i romp on the gas.

on the highway in 4th gear, i'll stand on the rear brake to load the suspension, then clutch the SHEEET out of it and the combination of the three will get me up to balance point.

Heres an example of a 5mph wheelie at balance point.


and heres one a little past balance point... both of which i clutched up.
I actually pull my body closer the higher i get to scraping... its easier to steer, and gets weight of the back... i.e. it makes the balance point higher, or further back, so when i touch the 12 bar it hits softer....



anyway, after you master launching the front end in the air over and over to the exact same point, the "riding it out" part will come naturally.

If you dont master lifting the tire, then you'll continue to scare yourself by launching to high, or too low and then throttling it hard and nearly flipping yourself over.
 

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the bike has a 165 main jet in it plus the race air box cover and akra cans
Needle on the 4th clip? Fuel screw 2-1/2 to 3 turns out? You should be golden. The bike is so torquey, it will want to come up at low revs. Awesome bike BTW. :thumbup: Photos?
 

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Thanks for all the help guys. I went and tooled around for a little bit and I can already see improvement. I moved farther back on my seat and used the quick blip then full throttle method. Before my wheelies/pop ups were like "braa" down, now its more like braaaaaa down. Sounds stupid but I couldnt think of a better why to describe it via forum lol. Im keeping them up at least twice as long as i was before but I dont think im hitting the balance point quite yet. But like you guys were saying the more i do it the more comfortable i feel when the front comes up so I think I'll be there soon. I need to hit up a parking lot I think. So far i have been just doing them from stop signs or lights lol so I dont get to do the slow down thing.
 

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Balance point Q

Hey guys - I don't think this has been covered in any of the posts I've read about wheelies. How big is the balance point range? In other words, how long do you have when the bike is near the balance point, at the balance point and at "I've just shat my pants"

I've been randomly popping wheelies on the 610 for a while now, nowhere near the balance point but I can't get over the mental hurdle of getting it up any higher.

I know on the pushie the balance point (range) is very small. I assume its very different on a motard.

Hope you can help
 

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The balance point sweet spot is pretty large on sumos, but to be honest I had the same issue as you do Steve. It scared me a little having the bike up that high. The thing that helped me the most was riding fifties to get a feel for BP without wanting to bail, and taught me brake control. :thumbup:
 

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the reason the balance point seems larger is you have a lighter bike, with a lot more engine braking.... on a sportbike, its heavy, and once you cross the "hump" you're probably on the gas so hard you'll fly right by the balance point, and you'll start sinking backwards... w/o heavy compression braking, then you HAVE to use the rear brake... so the balance point feels like its a narrow range.

Truth is, no wheelie is really ever 100% at the balance point... you're always rocking in and out of it in small amounts... the smaller amounts you rock before and after it, the more balanced you look and feel.

the actual balance POINT on any bike is essentially the same - just a single point at which your balanced... but the amount you can go in front of or behind that point and keep the bike stable, and up in the air, and manageable, varies on all bikes.

on a sportbike, unless you pick the bike directly up to the balance point, you have to give it a good bit of gas to bring the front end on up (get it over the hump)... this results in you approaching the balance point very rapidly... then you try to yank off the gas to keep from going over, but you yank off to much, so now you have to add more, oops, too much, better let off again... Its just a bad deal all over...

on a supermoto, if you over the "hump" and 80% up, shes so light and has so much power, you can just add a little gas at a time until you get close to balance.... no need to crack it wide open.

then as you approach the balance point, you let off a little, and slowly get to the balance point.

the better that you get, as you clutch it up, you'll go directly to the balance point and use the rear brake to stop the motor... you dont really ever let completely off the gas (and you keep your idle higher) and just ride the rear brake to smooth it out instead of jerking the throttle.

In those wheelie picture i posted... if it takes me more than 1 second to reach balance point, i usually set it down, come to a full stop, and start the wheelie over. No reason to fight it.


just remember THERE IS NO TROPHY FOR HOLDING OUT AND TRYING TO SAVE
A BAD WHEELIE.... just SET IT DOWN, and try again.


too many times i've seen someone dead set on "repairing" a bad wheelie and either holding it out too long in a parking lot and hitting the curb at the end, or simply trying to over correct and flipping the bike over.... I've done it. I've learned. Learn from my mistakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Needle on the 4th clip? Fuel screw 2-1/2 to 3 turns out? You should be golden. The bike is so torquey, it will want to come up at low revs. Awesome bike BTW. :thumbup: Photos?
I haven't played with any clips or fuel screws. How do i go about doing this? (I have an idea of carbs but have yet to 'play' with this one)
 
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