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DRZ or older TE610 maybe. Older KTMs are paint shakers, newer ones are too expensive... Maybe if you can find a KLX650 converted to a motard, might fit the budget too, and probably better for distance than the smaller displacement bikes.

Honestly, supermoto and long distance aren't usually spoken in the same sentence unless you mean the twin cylinder big supermotos. My 690 is about the minimum level of comfort I'd consider taking a REAL long ride on.
That's what I thought. I've ridden a few sports bikes and I just don't like them. So ill probably have to go with a drz or xrr and just take it easy on any long rides
 

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Oops I meant SM610, not TE... TE is the dual sport version.
 

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I'm leaning towards a drz400 And converting to a supermoto. Any opinions and info would be great
Perhaps I am missing something... the DRZ400 is offered (was offered) in 3 models.

DRZ400e - dirt bike only
DRZ400s - Dual Sport with Dirt Suspension
DRZ400sm - Dedicated supermoto (this is what I have)

I do not live in Cali but I have heard of difficulties in getting a dirt bike (DRZ400e) converted and tagged for on-road use. Not impossible but can be quite difficult.

I would think going with a DRZ400s or sm would be the way to go. Expect about $3,000 ballpark depending on options on the bike. (East Coast numbers, Cali prices prolly vary.)


As a DRZ400sm owner who lives in and near some crazy twisties in East TN, I can tell you it's both a blast to ride AND a dangerous bike to ride. Dangerous in the sense that you'll find hooliganism is a bit easy to perform. Not as easy as some of the bigger powerplant supermotos but it's still there. Last thing you want is a bike that wants to do wheelies all the time or go uber fast without thinking about it.

Just remember it's all fun and games til we see you trying to run from the cops or crash on one of the infamous twisty roads out there.

You're 17. You are going to want to go fast and do wheelies and do other hooligan things. You know it and I know it. If you do not currently realize you are going to be a hooligan at times, you will after you start to figure out what your bike can and can not do. It's a normal progression. Gear up, get training, practice until you can operate the machine without thinking about it. I heavily suggest you keep the hooligan stuff for off road until you can get your skill level to a point where you are not going to immediately be a threat to other riders or drivers around you. Your basic training to have your motorcycle endorsement/license is not enough. The more time you spend on a motorcycle, the more you realize your "training" will never end. There is always something else to learn or work on. Even professional riders log hundreds of hours of practice each year.


I love my DRZ400sm but I do not rely on it as my primary machine. It has it's purpose and it does a good job at that, but as others have stated it's not a long(er) distance machine. If you are using it for commuting less than 50 mile runs at a time, I think you will be very happy with it. Keep in mind I say this as a owner of 7 motorcycles including two dedicated long-distance touring bikes.

Very easy to add a trunk (like a Givi) so you can throw school books or other things (laptop, tablet, etc.) and ride where you need to be.

When you want to learn a new "trick" or start thinking about doing this or that with your bike... search for those things on youtube so you have an idea of how things can go badly and plan for it accordingly.


Whatever bike you get, the day it's no longer FUN - it's time to make a change. Enjoy your bike despite those who say negative things about it. Have fun with it, but be safe.
 

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Perhaps I am missing something... the DRZ400 is offered (was offered) in 3 models.

DRZ400e - dirt bike only
DRZ400s - Dual Sport with Dirt Suspension
DRZ400sm - Dedicated supermoto (this is what I have)

I do not live in Cali but I have heard of difficulties in getting a dirt bike (DRZ400e) converted and tagged for on-road use. Not impossible but can be quite difficult.

I would think going with a DRZ400s or sm would be the way to go. Expect about $3,000 ballpark depending on options on the bike. (East Coast numbers, Cali prices prolly vary.)


As a DRZ400sm owner who lives in and near some crazy twisties in East TN, I can tell you it's both a blast to ride AND a dangerous bike to ride. Dangerous in the sense that you'll find hooliganism is a bit easy to perform. Not as easy as some of the bigger powerplant supermotos but it's still there. Last thing you want is a bike that wants to do wheelies all the time or go uber fast without thinking about it.

Just remember it's all fun and games til we see you trying to run from the cops or crash on one of the infamous twisty roads out there.

You're 17. You are going to want to go fast and do wheelies and do other hooligan things. You know it and I know it. If you do not currently realize you are going to be a hooligan at times, you will after you start to figure out what your bike can and can not do. It's a normal progression. Gear up, get training, practice until you can operate the machine without thinking about it. I heavily suggest you keep the hooligan stuff for off road until you can get your skill level to a point where you are not going to immediately be a threat to other riders or drivers around you. Your basic training to have your motorcycle endorsement/license is not enough. The more time you spend on a motorcycle, the more you realize your "training" will never end. There is always something else to learn or work on. Even professional riders log hundreds of hours of practice each year.


I love my DRZ400sm but I do not rely on it as my primary machine. It has it's purpose and it does a good job at that, but as others have stated it's not a long(er) distance machine. If you are using it for commuting less than 50 mile runs at a time, I think you will be very happy with it. Keep in mind I say this as a owner of 7 motorcycles including two dedicated long-distance touring bikes.

Very easy to add a trunk (like a Givi) so you can throw school books or other things (laptop, tablet, etc.) and ride where you need to be.

When you want to learn a new "trick" or start thinking about doing this or that with your bike... search for those things on youtube so you have an idea of how things can go badly and plan for it accordingly.


Whatever bike you get, the day it's no longer FUN - it's time to make a change. Enjoy your bike despite those who say negative things about it. Have fun with it, but be safe.
I do know I will end up doing hooligan stuff. I know the consequences of doing it because I have been riding motorcycle since I was 3. I'm not stupid like most teens my age and I don't put my self in situations where I will hurt myself and especially others. I will have to do a lot more research before I come up with a decision. And the drz-e has more hp stock that's why I want one to convert or find one already street legal
 

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Could someone school me on Husky's? I keep hearing that their maintenance schedules are very strict and frequent, but I've never actually heard a definitive answer. I've always liked the look of the Husky's, but if it's not really a commuter, then I don't want anything to do with it.

Any input?
 

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Could someone school me on Husky's? I keep hearing that their maintenance schedules are very strict and frequent, but I've never actually heard a definitive answer. I've always liked the look of the Husky's, but if it's not really a commuter, then I don't want anything to do with it.

Any input?
Razrbakk,

I need some schooling too. I have been lurking around for bout 2 years and might be getting an 06 SMR 510 w 3000 from a 47 year old grandpa. It has no mods and is clean enough to eat off. The issue is reliability. Don't mind checking valves and 500 mile oil changes. I want to rid it as a commuter, 10 miles both ways, no highway. I have heard they an go 13,000 without a problem, or they need a top end at 3,000. Real feedback from ole who has one would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I've noticed a lot of repeat questions in the original "best street-tard" thread, and also that a lot of people don't want to read through all 47 pages. I've gone through all the posts in the previously mention thread, and I think I've summed it up fairly well. I've anyone has any more info to ad, go ahead, but please don't fill it up with "which is better, drz vs. husky 510".

****************************************************************

STREET:

KTM LC4 640, 3000 mile oil changes. Great for commuting. They require (relatively) little maintenance, and are not "pure race motors" at all.

KTM 625, excellent bike, excellent components, excellent handling. There is no reliability drawback over anything else, it's fast and fun. The 625SMC is arguably one of the best street-tards. KTM does all the hard work for you and sells them street legal from the factory. Their only drawback is that they vibrate. Bad. Some people think it shakes too much for street riding.

Where does the KTM 525 exc fit on this list?
 
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