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Somebody forgot to tell him that turbo's don't work very well on a single cylinder bike. Better off doing a supercharger driven off the water pump like the DS650 atv's used to do. or........ Just buying something with a very small amount of effort makes 54hp to start with, like a 450. Which sounds way simpler, and I'm going to venture with a bit more reliable.

Opinions are like a-holes, mine on this subject is that this is queer. Thumpertalk is also one of the greatest source of misinformation out there.

But it would be unique!
 

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Somebody forgot to tell him that turbo's don't work very well on a single cylinder bike. Better off doing a supercharger driven off the water pump like the DS650 atv's used to do. or........ Just buying something with a very small amount of effort makes 54hp to start with, like a 450. Which sounds way simpler, and I'm going to venture with a bit more reliable.

Opinions are like a-holes, mine on this subject is that this is queer. Thumpertalk is also one of the greatest source of misinformation out there.

But it would be unique!
lol... you havent been paying attention around here long..
theres a few turbo single cyl bikes that do very well.. they all have TINY turbos, but they work great.

while im in the no-replacement-for-displacement camp as well.. you have to admit a factory street legal 250 pumping out 50hp is impressive and probably very fun to ride.... not to mention faster then a DRZ.


my idea..... put a 450 in there... then turbo THAT. :lol:
 

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Wherein the world do you get a turbo that small though?
No idea. It still looks big for the application though. My guess would be a diesel generator, or a marine application.

One of the things that I see is that most turbo'd engines try to mount the turbo as close to the exhaust port as possible. In the case of my pickup the turbo is mounted to the exhaust manifold. There is still probably 5" from where all the exhaust passages meet and the driven turbine. There is alot of pipe inbetween the head and the turbo on this bike. It's not as critical on the intake side of the turbo but shorter is still better as it helps reduce lag. You don't have to compress as big a volume of air before the benifit is seen.


I refuse to get a Thumpertalk login so I hope the fabricator chimes in here. I'm not interested in purchasing one in the slightest but turbo talk is always interesting. I hope he's the honest type and tells the truth about the cons and pro's. At this point all I see is a big HP number. But if the dynograph is correct it does have a very smooth powerband, which I find VERY surprising.

I wonder how much boost he's actually getting? I think most turbo'd cars run 6-7lbs, my pickup ran 21 stock, pushs 35lbs with a box, and restricted wastegate. Having only one cylinder makes it hard to really get the numbers up, the exhaust pulse is constantly having to spin the turbine back up because the speed falls off because the time inbetween pulses is so long.

Its still cool, but I question the functionality of the whole thing.

edit: if he's getting almost 54hp with a stock engine, (besides the turbo), I wonder what could be gotten with a proper cam, some porting, and valve work? and at what point does it just implode?
 

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No idea. It still looks big for the application though. My guess would be a diesel generator, or a marine application.

One of the things that I see is that most turbo'd engines try to mount the turbo as close to the exhaust port as possible. In the case of my pickup the turbo is mounted to the exhaust manifold. There is still probably 5" from where all the exhaust passages meet and the driven turbine. There is alot of pipe inbetween the head and the turbo on this bike. It's not as critical on the intake side of the turbo but shorter is still better as it helps reduce lag. You don't have to compress as big a volume of air before the benifit is seen.


I refuse to get a Thumpertalk login so I hope the fabricator chimes in here. I'm not interested in purchasing one in the slightest but turbo talk is always interesting. I hope he's the honest type and tells the truth about the cons and pro's. At this point all I see is a big HP number. But if the dynograph is correct it does have a very smooth powerband, which I find VERY surprising.

I wonder how much boost he's actually getting? I think most turbo'd cars run 6-7lbs, my pickup ran 21 stock, pushs 35lbs with a box, and restricted wastegate. Having only one cylinder makes it hard to really get the numbers up, the exhaust pulse is constantly having to spin the turbine back up because the speed falls off because the time inbetween pulses is so long.

Its still cool, but I question the functionality of the whole thing.

edit: if he's getting almost 54hp with a stock engine, (besides the turbo), I wonder what could be gotten with a proper cam, some porting, and valve work? and at what point does it just implode?
It would be sweet if he could route he exhaust/turbo into the subframe, put a heat shield on the turbo and keep it inside the bike. That would make the exhaust valves happy with a longer pipe, hide the turbo, make the compressor pipe shorter/ more direct and out of the way of your leg and keep the "claimed" 10 extra pounds more centralized. That guy will read this and laugh because I know its probablly hard to do,but a good fabrictor can do wonders. How about a thicker head gasket, stronger head studs, some intake polishing like you said, an injector from an FJR, inline fuel pump, and a dynojet ignition module in conjunction with the PCIII? Yo would need to retrofit a new real wheel and some 160's :D One cylinder has proven to be effective before; they make turbo kits for the Yamaha Raptor 700efi and it makes near100 horse with not many issues. I a big fan of this gy for trying, I just think it can be refined more to look and act factory. That hot pipe has got to go!
 

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I just want to know what make , model and size that turbo is ,and how many psi of boost is it running to get over 50 hp. I'm thinking of turboing my 07 450 but I think I want the turbo where my airbox is now.
 

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No idea. It still looks big for the application though. My guess would be a diesel generator, or a marine application.

One of the things that I see is that most turbo'd engines try to mount the turbo as close to the exhaust port as possible. In the case of my pickup the turbo is mounted to the exhaust manifold. There is still probably 5" from where all the exhaust passages meet and the driven turbine. There is alot of pipe inbetween the head and the turbo on this bike. It's not as critical on the intake side of the turbo but shorter is still better as it helps reduce lag. You don't have to compress as big a volume of air before the benifit is seen.
I can tell you have hardly ANY experience with a turbo setup.

Turbos work off of pressure and heat..It doesn't matter the length of pipe before, or the location of the turbo in the exhaust stream.

If it did, you need to chime in on the corvette boards, and let them know their 1k WHP rear mounted (read: in the trunk/near the mufflers) turbo setups DON'T work.


The only problem I see with this kit is going to be intake temp's.
 
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