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So what exactly do you do in sipping? Never tried, maybe give it a try and see how it does
I have never done it on a road tires but have done it a bunch on rock crawler tires. I use a groover and turn the blade upside down and use the 2 sharp ends to sipe. Or you could just use a sharp blade. Just be careful not to slice too deep. I may give it a shot also. Just sipe the very middle of the tire. That way when you are on dirt which is when you are trying to keep the bike upright using more of the middle of the tire, you will be using the siping. I think I woud make a slice every half inch around the tire. maybe an inch to a inch and a half long. The tire will seperate at the sipe on acceleration and the sharp edge of the tire will grab a little. Same with braking also.That is the theroy at least.
 

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I have never done it on a road tires but have done it a bunch on rock crawler tires. I use a groover and turn the blade upside down and use the 2 sharp ends to sipe. Or you could just use a sharp blade. Just be careful not to slice too deep. I may give it a shot also. Just sipe the very middle of the tire. That way when you are on dirt which is when you are trying to keep the bike upright using more of the middle of the tire, you will be using the siping. I think I woud make a slice every half inch around the tire. maybe an inch to a inch and a half long. The tire will seperate at the sipe on acceleration and the sharp edge of the tire will grab a little. Same with braking also.That is the theroy at least.
Ok cool thanks for the explantion, I might try it on some old tires first so I don't go to deap and screw up new tires.:laughingr
 

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The next thing is tire pressure. For everyone this is difference! What works for me may not work for Jeff Ward or vice versa. A lot of things come into play. Riders weight, riding style, altitude, bike, brand of tires, suspension settings, track temp., track surface, amount of dirt, type of dirt...I think you get my point. I use tire warmers and like to do my tire pressure when they are hot. Depending on all of the above conditions my tire pressure hot ranges from 22-28. Most of the time I like to run about 25 or 26 both front and rear HOT. This translates to about 22-24 COLD.
First of all great write up!
I mostly road race (big tracks, no dirt) my supermoto, but the resident Dunlop tire guy suggested that I run my tires at 33 front/30 rear hot. It always seemed high to me, I am about 260 with all my gear on.
I do understand that there are various factors and preferences involved in this subject, but would like to hear opinions.
Thanks!
 

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I ran Pirelli Super Corsas on a full size road cousre (Grattan) a few years back and I had to run 30/30 to keep the tires from getting torn up. They stuck like glue too. 30/30 is pretty close to what I would have run on a full size sportbike. Faster tracks and higher corner speeds generate more heat.
 

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I run 32 in both the front and back. I think it has alot to do with each ridder. Im really light so it doesn't take as much pressure because the tires don't flex as much under my waight. (155lbs after a dump lol) My dad is 230lbs and runs 36 front and 34 rear....I think you should just try them at dif pressures and see what hooks up the best with the least amount and movement. LOL my road bike tires ( bicycle) are kept at 58lbs were most keep there's at 60-64.
 

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the way i understand that putting cuts into the tire was just to help the rubber move around the same as what your doing with the siping you talk about , not putting groves for more traction ????
 

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Tire choice

many brands mentioned. one thing not mentioned for newbies is to get supermoto specific tires. They are formulated to warm up in a lighter weight bike. I've been using the Continentals and love them, have had 2 pair and plan on getting a third.
 

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I got on a set of continental SM DOT tires and they are not much better than knobbies on the asphalt and not much better than slicks in the dirt. I love my dunlops and at my skill level am happy with metzler as well but comparing non-DOT race slicks with DOT SM tires is not very fair.
 

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It is very much useful and beneficial for me. You have described it in a very descriptive and understandable manner so everybody understand it very easily. This post is equally beautiful and moving and congrats to you for surviving.
 

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If I understand well, sipping helps getting hotter temperature in the tires.

I am currently racing the adult mini class in NorCal, with a YZ85. Due to my lack of skills and because I do not have the luxury to own tire warmers, I was wondering if sipping would not be the way to go.
What do you guys think?

And if it is the way to go, how would you sip the tires?
 

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So if you have a pyrometer what is the temp you are looking for optimal temp?
I forgot to check my temps last weekend(having too much fun). On the street my tires seem to heat up and cool down to about 120F. I would guess on the track you are probably looking around 150f rear, maybe a little less front on a tight track with mid 20s psi.
 

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Can I ask that for those who regularly ride on supermoto specific track tires (slicks, cut slicks, etc..) would you ever run them on a mostly street biased ride?

I do some light commuting and running around town on my KTM 690 SMC, but also at least 50% or more of the time do some parking lot practicing/mock racing.

Do SM specific tires need to still be good and hot to work well? I would think that dirt sections and the lower speeds on cart tracks would generally keep temps lower than a road race/sportbike track tire.

Just wondering for my next set of tires if I should maybe try out a set of Maxxis or whatever, or if I'm going to be better off with what I have been running (Mich Pilot Powers)

Mileage & longevity is not too big a factor in my consideration. But I do need them to work at least as well as my Pilot Powers in cool weather and on street rides.

I know that track day tires do not work as well in sportbike applications and need decent heat generation to work well, just wondering if SM tires are the same?
 

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So SM specific track tires are then the same in design as a supersport track tire where they only work in a small temperature window.

I'm surprised though that they get very warm considering the shorter typical corners, lower speeds, and dirt sections on a typical SM course. Good to know and I'll stick to the supersport street/trackday tires.
 

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Don't run a race compound/slick on the street. You will never get them up to the temperature that they need to be.
Good point. Also, I've read that slicks have a certain life on heat cycles. Once it has been heated up so many times, they become really slippery. I've never ran slicks before, so take this with a grain of salt.
 

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Good point. Also, I've read that slicks have a certain life on heat cycles. Once it has been heated up so many times, they become really slippery. I've never ran slicks before, so take this with a grain of salt.
The first turn you go into with a cold slick it will start to push the front end. The problem is you have to heat the sides up by leaning, just riding straight wont do it. A soft DOT compound tire will give you a lot more grip cold. The only time i could see it working out is in the middle of the summer. If taken my tire temps on dots that sat parked all day and they were (on one side) up to track temps, or close.
 
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