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Discussion Starter #1
Guys, in the back of the owners manual it has a suggested sag setting range from 2.76" - 3.15" w/ approximately 7/8" free sag.

I've always felt this bike was too tall and too stiff for general tarding so I was eager to check this #.

Well at my 180# weight the bike had about 2.5" of rider sag which is not enough.

At first I tried to adjust it w/ the punch as the spanner wrenches just wouldn't get in there. I spun it some but mostly I just crapped up the aluminum spanner nuts.

Then I removed the muffler and 2 bolts from the lower subframe and jacked up the back end like this:



Although the shock was more accessable the spanner tool included in the tool kit was still useless. Anyways, I finished adjusting the sag w/ the punch (it was easier to reach w/ the subframe jacked up). I then slid my forks up a good more than they already were (which was quite a bit). I probably have around 1/2" of fork overhang over the triple clamps right now.

Anyways, I'm happier w/ it now. It's more forgiving, lower, and softer, and yet still 100% capable of killing it thru the turns.

Just thought you guys might want to know.
 

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looks good....

to get more sag, adjusting the preload, looking from the top down on the shock, you loosen the nuts, so CCW, will put less tension on the spring, less preload, lowers the back end some
 

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Try backing off the high-speed compression adjuster a 1/2 turn and see how it feels in the corners. Rumor has it that less high-speed compression allows the bike to squat in the corners a little more.

Be very careful with the shock body, the new ones are fine threaded aluminum bodies and its easy to to ruin the threads.
 
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