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Very well said spamrot.:thumbup:
 

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Actually Spamrot, 17,000 miles in 15 months is plausible.

If you ride everyday to and from work and add in weekend rides, you can hit that kind of mileage easily.

I've had my new Sumo for 2 1/2 months and already have 3500 miles on it. At this rate I will have 21,000 miles in 15 months. And I do not even ride everyday.
 

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Right On! Spamrot, [showing my age, dammit]
lauriejennifer is entitled to a certain level of squidliness without the likes if us, being formerly squidly ourselves [and we all have been] being too hard on her. Besides any female who has the gumption to devote herself to riding well deserves our respect.
 

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Some of the evidence of squid douchery in here reminds of these guys I used to see all the time when I lived in Maine. They would roll through town what seemed like 300 times a day wearing riding jackets, but matched the jackets up with shorts and sneakers... No gloves, no helmets (the occasional one hanging off the back of the bike for the potential passenger). My personal favorite though are the fools that think an Icon zip up hoody is protective gear!
 

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As an avid rider, racer, and past mechanic I can detect squids with my eyes shut. Laurie, I declare you squid-larva. Sounds weird but there is a reason. You are a newer rider with little experience under your belt, however, you seem aimed in the right direction with good intention. I see faith in you young grasshopper. BUT...you most definatly have squid tendencies and these are most likely due to your lack of experience and overall exposure to the culture.

Wheelying is cool, but comes after the much needed experience factor. Don't stress this so much, kinda makes ya look squidly.

Admitting or bragging about how you rocked someone on the street other than a close friend or family member is squid language 101. There is no real competition on the street, no matter how bad your 250cc single cylinder supermoto spanked a 160hp rocket.

The mohawk doesn't make cars see you a split second faster before they run you over. It just makes other riders stay far far behind you.

OH, and I don't want to call you out but 15 months of riding an 17,000 miles? Not saying it is impossible but highly unlikely for someone as new as yourself. Typo? True?

Don't EVER let some dumbass tease you about your gear. Just tell those morons that when they crash and end up with permanent injuries or die that you won't feel sorry.

I think you have a really good mindset and direction. I think you will be ok. I just hope you don't get influenced by stupid people to stop wearing gear, riding safely, and start acting dueschy.

On a side note, I liked your videos on Youtube and your a lil cutie! Kudos to you and hope there are more female riders like you out there!

I appreciate your input, and do hope to stay on the "straight and narrow" (not literally, hopefully! A few turns in the road would be nice...). Thanks for the exhortation! Allow me to reply:

Wheelies are only something I've recently wanted to learn, after putting a year under my belt. I'm not talking about riding wheelies in traffic or down the highway. I mean I just want to learn how to even pop a little one as a way to get over an obstacle, etc. Panic stops and swerving are already under my belt (and always need refining). It's another defensive technique I'd like to learn. "Riding a wheelie" is a skill that I personally don't think belongs on public roads, but I bet the ability is useful in learning another way to control a motorcycle. The closest example I can think of is parkour (something else I love). Flips are technically not parkour, but learning how to do a front or back flip can aide in learning spacial awareness, control, power, etc. Even if you would never do a flip while doing actual parkour, the skills gained in knowing how to do one would cross apply...

The reference to the R1 was actually riding with a friend. The point of my story (though poorly stated), was that I could see he was struggling with his new bike on corners, but wanted to be the Straight Line Hero on the open stretches. On those twisty roads, neither of us were speeding. And I let him stay in the lead... but I kept having to intentionally back off. And I could see he was having a rough time of it, while I kept asking myself, "Why are we going so slow?" Another time, a guy on a ZX10 destroyed me. But he was weaving in and out of traffic, and I'm not comfortable doing that. I don't like to make cagers squirrelly. They're unpredictable enough as it is.

I have actually had MANY people come up to me in a store or on the street (my helmet would not be with me, it would be locked on the bike), and say, "Hey, I saw you! You have a pink mohawk, right? That's a cool helmet!" Clearly, it is helping. People glance once, and then do a doubletake. Then they laugh, but hey. They saw me. And besides, women like to accessorize. The helmet matches my gloves and my backpack. :rolleyes:

Oh, yes. 17,000 miles is pretty accurate. Of course, the first 2,300 miles were on my little 50cc scooter (which I know you may not count). And I did that between February and June. It's hard to rack up miles on a machine that tops out at 40 (...downhill with the wind at my back...). I put 12,300 on my Ninja 250 before the fateful episode with the pothole from hell. There were a few trips between Kansas City and Chicago, a trip to Indiana, and a trip to Wisconsin to help boost mileage... But mostly it was daily commuting and intentionally taking the long way home. That was done between June and March. Yes, I rode all winter, except for a couple weeks in January when there was nasty, nasty weather and I borrowed a car. I bought my KLX250sf in late March and have since put on 2,700 miles. Keep in mind it is my only vehicle.

I was a firm believer in gear before my crash. I'm even more convinced now. If my shoulder hadn't been dislocated (because the road was seriously THAT rough) as I slid, I would have been able to walk away. Not a scratch on me. Not even a headache. The biggest bruise was from the IV.

The main person I ride with is an old cruiser who's been riding for over 30 years, without so much as ever scratching a bike. He's a great rider and a great mentor. I try not to surround myself with bad influences. (By the way, when I took him to the spot where I crashed, he called it "a disaster waiting to happen for a motorcycle" and said that even with all his years of riding, he probably would have crashed, too. Sometimes I think fate just hates me)

Glad you enjoyed the vids! And I also hope more women start riding. I see a few around here, but they are rare and I only know one personally.


Okay, obnoxiously long reply is over! :anim_peep:
 

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Discussion Starter #87
I appreciate your input, and do hope to stay on the "straight and narrow" (not literally, hopefully! A few turns in the road would be nice...). Thanks for the exhortation! Allow me to reply:

Wheelies are only something I've recently wanted to learn, after putting a year under my belt. I'm not talking about riding wheelies in traffic or down the highway. I mean I just want to learn how to even pop a little one as a way to get over an obstacle, etc. Panic stops and swerving are already under my belt (and always need refining). It's another defensive technique I'd like to learn. "Riding a wheelie" is a skill that I personally don't think belongs on public roads, but I bet the ability is useful in learning another way to control a motorcycle. The closest example I can think of is parkour (something else I love). Flips are technically not parkour, but learning how to do a front or back flip can aide in learning spacial awareness, control, power, etc. Even if you would never do a flip while doing actual parkour, the skills gained in knowing how to do one would cross apply...

The reference to the R1 was actually riding with a friend. The point of my story (though poorly stated), was that I could see he was struggling with his new bike on corners, but wanted to be the Straight Line Hero on the open stretches. On those twisty roads, neither of us were speeding. And I let him stay in the lead... but I kept having to intentionally back off. And I could see he was having a rough time of it, while I kept asking myself, "Why are we going so slow?" Another time, a guy on a ZX10 destroyed me. But he was weaving in and out of traffic, and I'm not comfortable doing that. I don't like to make cagers squirrelly. They're unpredictable enough as it is.

I have actually had MANY people come up to me in a store or on the street (my helmet would not be with me, it would be locked on the bike), and say, "Hey, I saw you! You have a pink mohawk, right? That's a cool helmet!" Clearly, it is helping. People glance once, and then do a doubletake. Then they laugh, but hey. They saw me. And besides, women like to accessorize. The helmet matches my gloves and my backpack. :rolleyes:

Oh, yes. 17,000 miles is pretty accurate. Of course, the first 2,300 miles were on my little 50cc scooter (which I know you may not count). And I did that between February and June. It's hard to rack up miles on a machine that tops out at 40 (...downhill with the wind at my back...). I put 12,300 on my Ninja 250 before the fateful episode with the pothole from hell. There were a few trips between Kansas City and Chicago, a trip to Indiana, and a trip to Wisconsin to help boost mileage... But mostly it was daily commuting and intentionally taking the long way home. That was done between June and March. Yes, I rode all winter, except for a couple weeks in January when there was nasty, nasty weather and I borrowed a car. I bought my KLX250sf in late March and have since put on 2,700 miles. Keep in mind it is my only vehicle.

I was a firm believer in gear before my crash. I'm even more convinced now. If my shoulder hadn't been dislocated (because the road was seriously THAT rough) as I slid, I would have been able to walk away. Not a scratch on me. Not even a headache. The biggest bruise was from the IV.

The main person I ride with is an old cruiser who's been riding for over 30 years, without so much as ever scratching a bike. He's a great rider and a great mentor. I try not to surround myself with bad influences. (By the way, when I took him to the spot where I crashed, he called it "a disaster waiting to happen for a motorcycle" and said that even with all his years of riding, he probably would have crashed, too. Sometimes I think fate just hates me)

Glad you enjoyed the vids! And I also hope more women start riding. I see a few around here, but they are rare and I only know one personally.


Okay, obnoxiously long reply is over! :anim_peep:
Laurie,

Although your reply was the longest in SMJ history, it was also very good :) Thanks for the clarification :thumbup:

You just moved a notch up and away from the squid classification. Laurie we all start off as squids, its unavoidable. At first the twist of the wrist is just so cool that we forget the great responsibility that comes with it.

Learning to wheelie for purposes such as getting past certain obstacles is a good thing to know, but not really for the street. Dirt riding and supermoto on the other hand it can be a great thing to know, however, it is a much different technique than ripping a wheelie on the street.

I didn't necessarily think that you had made up the mileage, I just thought it was highly unlikely (and for 99% of riders it is). If a motorcycle is your main form of transportation I not only applaud you, but think that's pretty gnarly.

So keep riding your ride and don't let any squid influence you. Just remember, when in doubt - safe is the best route.
 

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Laurie, you rock girl. :rock:

That was the sweetest "Go eat $hit and die" I have ever read...:nutkick: :rofl:

Would be great to have you as a riding partner. If your ever in Guam, let's ride. :bike::bike: We can squid out together. :arsenal


BTW, my latest squid spotting today. Dude is riding a scooter in shorts, t-shirt, flip flops, has a full face Sumo helmet and a Icon back protector vest. :laughingr

I wish I would've had my camera, as I would have taken a picture for you guys.
 

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BTW, my latest squid spotting today. Dude is riding a scooter in shorts, t-shirt, flip flops, has a full face Sumo helmet and a Icon back protector vest. :laughingr

I wish I would've had my camera, as I would have taken a picture for you guys.
Haha that shit always has me scratching my head. I frequently see leather jkts paired with shorts and flip flops...why even bother?
I had a squid spotting in the middle of sunday afternoon traffic. 2 Gixxer squiddies in jeans and Tshirts, one had these hello-kitty looking ears/horns on his helmet. They both lifted up these weak ass little power wheelies off this stoplight side by side. I was so amazed by their awesome skills :rolleyes2:
 

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The reference to the R1 was actually riding with a friend. The point of my story (though poorly stated), was that I could see he was struggling with his new bike on corners, but wanted to be the Straight Line Hero on the open stretches. On those twisty roads, neither of us were speeding. And I let him stay in the lead... but I kept having to intentionally back off. And I could see he was having a rough time of it, while I kept asking myself, "Why are we going so slow?"
Unfortunately too many young men fall into the trap of thinking big bike means they are cooler in the sportbike pecking order. A big powerful bike like that can be very intimidating and they rarely learn to ride very well. They don't understand that the very people they are trying to impress can spot a newby on a big bike in about 5 seconds and we are not impressed by that.

I was a firm believer in gear before my crash. I'm even more convinced now. If my shoulder hadn't been dislocated (because the road was seriously THAT rough) as I slid, I would have been able to walk away. Not a scratch on me. Not even a headache. The biggest bruise was from the IV.
I dislocated my shoulder two seasons ago and that fricken HURTS! Good on you for not giving up after a good crash and injury. Too many people get spooked by their first big crash and quit riding because of it.

The main person I ride with is an old cruiser who's been riding for over 30 years, without so much as ever scratching a bike. He's a great rider and a great mentor. I try not to surround myself with bad influences.
I'm not trying to badmouth your friend but only to pass along a little of my experience with long time riders who have never crashed. In my experience the vast majority of people who have been riding a long time without ever having crashed is that they have a lot of bad habits and are not all that skilled. Most of the time people survive on luck and being really timid.

Crashing is a part of this sport. It is the only way to know where your limits are. The only way to improve your skills is to push your limits and getting close to your limits means you are at risk of crashing. It is a double edged sword but it is the reality of motorcycling. People who never push their limits never learn new things or expand their skills.
 

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. . . Most of the time people survive on luck and being really timid. . . . . . Crashing is a part of this sport. . . . .
I agree with most of what you said, however, crashing is not part of the sport when pavement is involved, I have little experience with the dirt side so I am unqualified to comment. I have had very few incidents since 1967, none to speak of in recent decades, now I've jinked it.
As far as being timid, that is likely acurate for most, however, ride with me in my element sometime, I am not timid. I do not push my machine to it limits by a long shot, my chicken strips are fairly sizable but I make real good time through traffic.
 

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I'm not trying to badmouth your friend but only to pass along a little of my experience with long time riders who have never crashed. In my experience the vast majority of people who have been riding a long time without ever having crashed is that they have a lot of bad habits and are not all that skilled. Most of the time people survive on luck and being really timid.

Crashing is a part of this sport. It is the only way to know where your limits are. The only way to improve your skills is to push your limits and getting close to your limits means you are at risk of crashing. It is a double edged sword but it is the reality of motorcycling. People who never push their limits never learn new things or expand their skills.
If I was still living in Kansas City, I might agree with you to a certain extent. But, you should ride with us in Chicago traffic sometime. It takes balls. Anyone who has ridden around here for decades without crashing has mad reflexes and quick wits. Does he "push his bike to its limits?" No, of course not. Not usually. He's not that kind of rider. He's a cruiser, through and through. But he's a level headed rider and he's good at handling his bike. He regularly teaches new people how to ride, and was offered a spot as an MSF instructor (hasn't taken them up on it yet). He can throw his Triumph America around a cone weave like it's a scooter. When I want to ride more... eh... motarded... I ride by myself. When I want to just go out for a cruise, we'll often ride together. That said, I've also gone through the twisties with him, and it was an equal match (not that we were racing). He's even taken his Triumph to the Dragon. He's got the massively scraped up footpegs to prove it. There's video of that, with him keeping up with the sport bikes.
------

Now, back on topic, I thought I'd throw in a picture of myself as a squid. This was taken 5 years ago when I was on vacaction in Thailand with friends. This was before I started riding, obviously, and was actually only the second time I had ever been on a motorcycle/scooter (I'm on back):



That's pretty classic squid! I experienced my first "crash" later that day. We dumped it in the ditch that was off to the side of the dirt road.. lol Thanks to the grass, we weren't hurt at all. ;-)
 

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hahaha. i saw another one yesterday. i was at the skatepark and this douche bag that i know of showed up and tried making a scene...i walked up to check his bike out....he was on a gxsr and was bragging how fast he could go...in a straight line....well i looked at his tires....ya you can go fast in a straight line there buddy...asked him about roads that hes been on and he said that my favorite road was fucked up and rocky...so i told him...you afraid of getting sideways or what?! kinda looked dumbfounded. ha. then he went all slow like off of the curb. weak. i woulda popped that shit off of the curb. im buddies with one of his friends....im ganna try to go ride with him just to prove hes a squid.
 

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hahaha. i saw another one yesterday. i was at the skatepark and this douche bag that i know of showed up and tried making a scene...i walked up to check his bike out....he was on a gxsr and was bragging how fast he could go...in a straight line....well i looked at his tires....ya you can go fast in a straight line there buddy...asked him about roads that hes been on and he said that my favorite road was fucked up and rocky...so i told him...you afraid of getting sideways or what?! kinda looked dumbfounded. ha. then he went all slow like off of the curb. weak. i woulda popped that shit off of the curb. im buddies with one of his friends....im ganna try to go ride with him just to prove hes a squid.
any possible way you can get helmet cam of the guy? You know he will turn all squidly when the camera comes on.
 

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Its 22degreesC outside in the UK (around 8C more than average for this time of year). Saw a lad today in jeans t shirt and trainers with a lid on, on an R1. Pulled up at the side on the moto with full gear on an he says 'you're a bit over dressed aint ya?' 'no because i like to know if i come off im not going to look like a squid. Ciao.'
 

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Laurie,

Although your reply was the longest in SMJ history, it was also very good :) Thanks for the clarification :thumbup:

You just moved a notch up and away from the squid classification. Laurie we all start off as squids, its unavoidable. At first the twist of the wrist is just so cool that we forget the great responsibility that comes with it.

Learning to wheelie for purposes such as getting past certain obstacles is a good thing to know, but not really for the street. Dirt riding and supermoto on the other hand it can be a great thing to know, however, it is a much different technique than ripping a wheelie on the street.

I didn't necessarily think that you had made up the mileage, I just thought it was highly unlikely (and for 99% of riders it is). If a motorcycle is your main form of transportation I not only applaud you, but think that's pretty gnarly.

So keep riding your ride and don't let any squid influence you. Just remember, when in doubt - safe is the best route.
for years ive been told "when in doubt, gas it". wait, thats track talk... hehe

oh man, i remember on my first bike (2005 gs500f) i always used to wear tennis shoes, shorts, t-shirt, or cut off, and my full face. Man im glad those days are over. rarely do i wear tennis shoes when i ride, mostly my sidi's, Jeans, Jacket, gloves, full face. If i plan on having some fun i throw on my riding pants and zip em to my jacket.

Now, i did see a guy in Toledo, Ohio last night wearing 3 of the suction cup mohawks. So i guess you can consider that doosh X's 3?
 

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lol wow that's some awesome spray paint skillz! Wonder if theyhave tried grip tape on the rotors, u know for increased performance
 
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