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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, everyone, I'm a novice to this forum, and this is my first thread.

I'm in a bit of a dilema and other opinions would be very helpful. Last year I sold my street bike and decided to go sumo after riding a 510 smr and being very impressed by the fun factor (at significant lower speeds). I bought a smc 690 2009 and felt that I became a better rider with every ride I took. Done all the necessary mods: full akra with map, racing airbox, removed all the junk (sas, and solenoid) and fell flat on my back the day I upgraded to foam airfilter during a wheelie :thumbup:.

Long story short, I started going to the race track and scored some pretty impressive lap times, but at the end of the summer I fell pretty bad and got my ankle dislocated while pushing the bike to its limits (nothing severe and could have been avoided if I would have upgraded the street boots also). The track is very twistie and I'm starting to think that the bike isn't up for the job anymore. I love the bike for street use but I believe I reached its limit (with stock suspension at least) on the track.

I've never ridden a 450 in sumo setup. How does it compare to the smc? Would a suspension upgrade make a difference? Or should I start thinking of selling my bike and buying a yz 450 / 450 smr / 500exc / 510 smr / 570 fs ?
Thanks for your input.
 

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Buy a real smr.
Or stick to the street, which is what the 690 was designed for.

The track is very twistie and I'm starting to think that the bike isn't up for the job anymore. I love the bike for street use but I believe I reached its limit (with stock suspension at least) on the track.
I'll be taking my 690 to a kart track this summer but I mostly ride on the street at higher speeds and I recognize that it's not going to be the best bike for a track where the average speed is 50 mph or less.

There's no way I'd ever buy a 450 SMR. I'd hate the frequent motor rebuilds, and I spend too much time on the road. I'd rather ride than wrench. You're never going to get everything you want from one bike, so pick your tradeoffs or buy a 2nd bike.
 

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For kart tracks I would get a wr250x. Nice and light and power wouldn't be the issue. But I would keep the 690 for the street.

As to the poster that said no 450smr all I can say is lol! We don't buy smr's for reliability we buy for performance. If I wanted reliable I wouldn't have sold my cbr600rr.
 

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Have you exhausted the setup options of your suspension?

I dont know you level of experience riding but I reckon there is always something you can do to go a little bit faster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Buy a real smr.
That's what I assumed. Better start saving or sell it for a track only tard. I'm thinking that yz450f is the best for the buck. As for reliability, I'm a bit of a grease monkey and the miles you do on track are far less than you do on road. Gonna have some issues explaining to the wife that 2 bikes is a must.:Argue:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Have you exhausted the setup options of your suspension?

I dont know you level of experience riding but I reckon there is always something you can do to go a little bit faster.
I have to admit that I've always ridden on stock setup. I never botherd to set the clock either because I'm lasy :headscrat. I know that it would be an improvement but I weigh 145 pounds and thought that it wouldn't be that significant. Would it ?
 

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For kart tracks I would get a wr250x. Nice and light and power wouldn't be the issue. But I would keep the 690 for the street.

As to the poster that said no 450smr all I can say is lol! We don't buy smr's for reliability we buy for performance. If I wanted reliable I wouldn't have sold my cbr600rr.
There's a lot more to "performance" than just light weight, particularly if the performance is measured on the street and not on the cart track. This is the reason that 450 SMR's are not the right bike for many people.

Used dirt 450's are a dime a dozen though, and adding one as a 2nd bike with a SM conversion could be done farily cheaply.
 

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I have to admit that I've always ridden on stock setup. I never botherd to set the clock either because I'm lasy :headscrat. I know that it would be an improvement but I weigh 145 pounds and thought that it wouldn't be that significant. Would it ?
YES!!! The suspension setup on a bike can make a huge difference in cornering speed and behavior of the bike. Especially when you are on a track testing the limits of the bike.

At 145 lbs the bike is way oversprung for you. Which will be harsh riding and you won't be getting all of the traction that you could be.

I maintain that the best money you can put into a bike is to have the suspension set up for your weight and riding style. It will have a bigger influence on lap times than all of the mods you have already done to the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
YES!!! The suspension setup on a bike can make a huge difference in cornering speed and behavior of the bike. Especially when you are on a track testing the limits of the bike.

At 145 lbs the bike is way oversprung for you. Which will be harsh riding and you won't be getting all of the traction that you could be.

I maintain that the best money you can put into a bike is to have the suspension set up for your weight and riding style. It will have a bigger influence on lap times than all of the mods you have already done to the bike.
Thanks... I'll look into it !
 

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At 145 lbs the bike is way oversprung for you. Which will be harsh riding and you won't be getting all of the traction that you could be.
Indeed, the 690 is one of the rare bikes that seems set up for big heavy dudes from the factory, while all the japanese brands come ready for 140 pounders. I'm pushing 200 and it feels pretty good to me, still a bit on the stiff side. The last DRZ400 I rode just about bottomed out when I sat on it.

On Youtube, do a search for Dave Moss videos on suspension setup. The video series is called OnTheThrottle. I learned a lot about suspension tuning from him.
 

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The 690 is great for RR tracks, I rode mine all year with the CMRA, perfect bike!
I own a 560 smr for kart tracks.

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
570 fs

Found a 570 fs at the dealer from whom I bought the smc. I'll give them a call tomorrow and se if I can get a buyback. It's the 2010 model with only 15 hours on the dash and it's too cheap to be true. Hope there's nothing wrong with it and it isn't sold yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The 690 is great for RR tracks, I rode mine all year with the CMRA, perfect bike!
I own a 560 smr for kart tracks.

Nice pics btw.
You're putting your knee down when riding a sumo. I got so used with throwing the leg that last time I was testdriving a cbr I found myself riding it like a sumo :wtf:
 

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Nice pics btw.
You're putting your knee down when riding a sumo. I got so used with throwing the leg that last time I was testdriving a cbr I found myself riding it like a sumo :wtf:
off topic, but to me in anything other than tight 1st/2nd gear turns leaning off the bike and into the corner (knee down style) is the only way to go around a corner like a fast sweeper. Leg out style will require you to lean the bike much to far over to achieve the same speed & you will loose grip level with that much lean. The way to properly ride a sumo is to use a combination of both depending on the corner style and speed. (and if your wondering who I am to give such info, I'm just sharing what I learned in a phone conversation on the subject with Greg Trachy the accomplished Pro Supermoto racer/teacher/pikes peak class winner)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
off topic, but to me in anything other than tight 1st/2nd gear turns leaning off the bike and into the corner (knee down style) is the only way to go around a corner like a fast sweeper. Leg out style will require you to lean the bike much to far over to achieve the same speed & you will loose grip level with that much lean. The way to properly ride a sumo is to use a combination of both depending on the corner style and speed. (and if your wondering who I am to give such info, I'm just sharing what I learned in a phone conversation on the subject with Greg Trachy the accomplished Pro Supermoto racer/teacher/pikes peak class winner)
I was taking a tight left turn in 1st, but as I said it felt really weird doing so on a street bike. Of course I won't be throwing the leg in a 40+ mph turn on my sumo, it's obvious you need a combination of the two. It's just funny when doing so on a street bike. (off topic, I was not judging your riding style but concluded that you always ride like that because there are lots of riders that move from street to sumo and don't change their riding style)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have a sms630 and just picked up a fs570. I bought the second bike for track riding. I hear your regret but the heavy sumos can run too. Just look at a svx550, it is a 300 pounder also. Get your suspension done.
Are you pleased with the berg? Is it really that different?
I should have taken a test drive back in autumn when I had the chance.
 

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I'm very happy with the berg. I have a situation were I commute only four miles to work and we have a local kart track with tight turns. I don't want to get rid of my husky sms630 because taking it on a hundred mile rode rode in the mountains it is by far a better bike and more comfortable than the fs570
 
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