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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been playing around with backing it into turns, started out on dirt to get used to the idea. But now that i am trying it on pavement my rear wheel just hops and it does not feel/look right. I am coming into the turn at the top of 3rd and can get the rear to break loose going down into 2nd or 1st. It starts out fine but a little into it the back starts jumping around and i am afraid i am going to high side.


Any advice?
 

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Ive found similar things happen with my bike....honestly I think its the road surface and I dont know about you but I have a sort of hesitance when I do it on the street. I usually do it making a 90 degree turn onto another street, or really tight corners on the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
the road surface it perfect where i was trying it, newly paved parking lot. But yeah i am a bit more hesitant to do it on the street just because i know how much bike parts cost. oh and i guess it might hurt a little
 

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If the road surface is good than its probably suspension set up. If your downshifting to first it could be locking up as well instead of engine braking. :headscrat
 

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If you dont have a slipper clutch (Sounds like you dont) you need to manually slip the clutch lever. This allows the rear wheel to break traction slightly without hopping but still be engaged to the engine and slow you down.

This is also how you would back it into a tight turn, Just add a lot of front brake and lean (yourself or the bike depending on your riding style) into the turn.
 

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If you dont have a slipper clutch (Sounds like you dont) you need to manually slip the clutch lever. This allows the rear wheel to break traction slightly without hopping but still be engaged to the engine and slow you down.

This is also how you would back it into a tight turn, Just add a lot of front brake and lean (yourself or the bike depending on your riding style) into the turn.
+1...you gotta get over the fear of grabbing a big handful of front brake to unload the rear, and then modulate the clutch after the downshift........Easier said than done though:D
 

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One thing I found that helps.. If Im riding MX style with a foot out, I make sure Im pushing the inside of the handlebar down. It seems to help keep the slide fluid and easier to transition from the slide to turn. And helps to slide deeper :D
 

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LOL! if you dont have a slipper, which it sounds that you dont. get use to feathering your clutch after you bang down few gears and lightly cover the rear brake after you commit to sliding through the corner! and dont forget to keep a proper body positioning :thumbup:
 

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LOL! if you dont have a slipper, which it sounds that you dont. get use to feathering your clutch after you bang down few gears and lightly cover the rear brake after you commit to sliding through the corner! and dont forget to keep a proper body positioning :thumbup:
+1 It also takes some practice too. You just don't go out there and slide in deep into a corner right off the bat. It's all about the feathering of the clutch and some rear brake at the same time.

I would also suggest not trying this, unless you have some good gear. One wrong move trying to back it in and you could be sent to the moon in hurry.

Speaking from experience.:lol:
 

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i feel sorry for the bike, sounds like you've almost been dropping the clutch after banging it down a few gears, and the suspension and road surface are not to blame, just takes practice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
i feel sorry for the bike, sounds like you've almost been dropping the clutch after banging it down a few gears, and the suspension and road surface are not to blame, just takes practice!
i am not just dumping the clutch out hard, and i know it'll take practice. that is why i am asking for advice so i can know what to focus on.

oh and as for gear i am wearing a decent amount. I dont have leathers yet but i had stuff left over from my rocket days so i am wearing an a* bionic jacket, padded compression shorts, field armor knee/shin guards, boots, gloves, and a MX helmet.


but thanks for the advice everyone
 

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I've experienced the wheel hopping around too. I found it was because A) my suspension is completely jacked and B) I was going to slow not using enough front brake.

After taking the 630 out to the track I think the most important part of backing it in is going to be your suspension. If its not set right you'll be fighting it the whole time. Next would be speed and front brake. After that it'll take practice and confidence.

Post pics when you get it figured out :thumbup:
 

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What it really all boils down to is. You have to be going fast and I mean fast and brake late and hard. If you practice this, it will happen on it's own. After that, practice on the rear brake. It acts like a gauge on how far you step the bike out, and where you hit the apex of the corner when coming out of the slide. Rear end hop is a bad thing, that will end up in a high side.

Sounds like your trying to hard with the rear brake instead of using the clutch modulation. Suspension work helps, but is not necessary to back it in. Good front brakes is what it takes, and huskys have them.

Speed, big balls, and practice is the key to success. :thumbup:
 

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to be honest i never purposely 'practiced' backing it in, it just eventually started happening when i started riding hard enough and braking late.

just feather the clutch rather than fully releasing it.
 

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Speed, big balls, and practice is the key to success. :thumbup:
LOL! +1

I've backed it in once. Completely on accident and just about shat myself. To me backing it in means your sliding the @$$ end out while making the corner not getting a little slip'in slide while braking for the corner. Either way like Gutzy said, Speed and Big Balls.
 

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The 630 is great for backing it in. Even with the stock suspension setup. It's all about practice and having the guts :thumbup:
 

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sounds to me like your not feathering the clutch and just dumping it. what i do it is downshift and dump the clutch to break the rear tire loose then after it breaks loose pull the clutch back in and feather it into the apex. but im no expert.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
went out and used the advice yall gave. the feathering the clutch is really helping. but i am starting out kinda slow, i had a little high side tonight but nothing too bad, the bark busters save it. but yeah unloading the rear with the front break is very easy on the 630, it is just having the balls and experience to do it at the right time
 

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Try this technique for slipping the clutch.

Use your index finger only to operate the lever, hold on to the bar with your other fingers. Then when you setup for a corner, hurry and fold your middle finger in half so the tip of it is against the bar. Then squeeze the lever to your middle finger that's sticking out. The lever isn't pulled in all the way so the clutch will slip. Every time you go to back it in you can do this, then you don't have to worry about trying to hold the lever just right..
I have used this method and it seems to work, but I don't need to anymore. Got a slipper :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
i see people referring to slipper clutches all the time, what do they actually do? i can take a wild guess and say they slip when excessive force is applied but i have never ridden with one
 
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