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Hello, I need some help, has anyone used the Pirelli Scorpion tires on the KLX250sf? I have a set of Bridgestones OEM but I dont like the tire, niether the tread nor the grip, so I want to install a set of the Scorpion but they only have 120 on rim 17, would there be a problem if I install the 120 instead of the 110 front? and what about the rear one? should I keep the OEM Size of 130 or go bigger to 140? :headscrat

Thanks for the help!
 

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Same question but different bike

I have a BMW G650X Moto.
In front, I have a 120/70/17 Pirelli Diablo and want to go to a 140/80/17 Avon Distanzia.
Rear I am going to stay with a 160/60/17 because I do not have the room to go up (chain in the way).
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Hi, I kept reading and found this argument, wich I think is Valid:

"Oversized tires will pinch on a rim that is too small, making the contact area of the tire smaller than stock. You will have more tire to use, but less of it will be on the pavement at any one time. Make sense?

Stock sizes are all this bike needs anyway. I can easily scrape pegs with stock BT's now, and I still haven't used up quite all the chicken strips."

So Now my question would be, wich one to choose? Pirelli Sport Demon or Continental ContiGo! Im sticking with the OEM Size, and I believe a 140 for a front tire is going to be too wide, the rim wont fit right even if you have room and you will definitely loose the easiness of entering a curve.
 

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In front, I have a 120/70/17 Pirelli Diablo and want to go to a 140/80/17 Avon Distanzia.
so you want to put a tyre ment for a rear wheel on the front of your bike :headscrat

110 or 120 front tyres are the conventional front tyre sizes on most bikes. a 110 is usually fitted on the smaller, lighter bikes. if you run a regular 120 sized tyre on the front going bigger serves no purpose at all. in your case it would be downright dangerous. maybe you overlooked them, but avon does make 120 sized tyres that are supposed to be used on the front of bikes.

the correct tyres for your bike depend on the rim size and the actual size of the tyre. eventhough you can have 2 160/60 size designated tyres, their actual size can differ by up to half an inch. if you have a 140 tyre that measures pretty thin you can get away with putting it on a smaller rim without distorting the profile of the tyre. it all depends on the tyre in question.
@gavale, head on over to the kawasaki section, there you'll find more info on your bike in specific.
 

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Agree---- and some other reasons why I am thinking of this........

Hi, I kept reading and found this argument, witch I think is Valid:

"Oversized tires will pinch on a rim that is too small, making the contact area of the tire smaller than stock. You will have more tire to use, but less of it will be on the pavement at any one time. Make sense?

tTrue, a wider tire on a narrow rim is going to have more of a ballooning affect and the contact area will be narrower. My front rim is probably a bit over 3" wide and its an aluminum wheel, not a spoke. Its wider than the rear of most dirtbike's in the 650 range so I am thinking that the "pinching" is not gonna be a big issue on my end.


Stock sizes are all this bike needs anyway. I can easily scrape pegs with stock BT's now, and I still haven't used up quite all the chicken strips."

On my end, I ride this bike more like an Enduro than a Sumo. What I have found is that the steering is quick.... almost too quick for the weight of the bike. With the Pirelli's, the front end wants to wash out when crossing water (especially if its flowing or somewhat deep). I will attribute that to several factors, two of which I will say are: tread-not really being designed for watercrossings and the gearing- not designed for lower speeds (16/47). I have lready changed the gearing and the low speed riding is better.
What I am looking to do is get maybe a little slower turning by going to the taller profile, better traction by going to a dual sport type tread, a little more flotation (on dirt and gravel) by going to a wider profile.




So Now my question would be, witch one to choose? Pirelli Sport Demon or Continental ContiGo! Im sticking with the OEM Size, and I believe a 140 for a front tire is going to be too wide, the rim wont fit right even if you have room and you will definitely loose the easiness of entering a curve.
I can't answer your question on what to go with. I can tell you that I have had the Pirelli Scorpions that came stock with this bike. Evryone of my buddies that has ridden it says it handles like a Bad MO-FO. It will scrape----- no question about that, so the pirellis do get traction.
I am not trying to jack the thread. I was looking for the same answers as you but for different reasons.
 

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so you want to put a tyre ment for a rear wheel on the front of your bike :headscrat
correct---- its market for rear fitment.

110 or 120 front tyres are the conventional front tyre sizes on most bikes. a 110 is usually fitted on the smaller, lighter bikes. if you run a regular 120 sized tyre on the front going bigger serves no purpose at all. in your case it would be downright dangerous. maybe you overlooked them, but avon does make 120 sized tyres that are supposed to be used on the front of bikes.
I know---- I have one here that I can use but I have some different reasons that i stated in a reply to the OP.

the correct tyres for your bike depend on the rim size and the actual size of the tyre. eventhough you can have 2 160/60 size designated tyres, their actual size can differ by up to half an inch. if you have a 140 tyre that measures pretty thin you can get away with putting it on a smaller rim without distorting the profile of the tyre. it all depends on the tyre in question.
How can they vary by 1/2" when the width is called out the same:headscrat
where are you talking about measuring thin ( thickness? llike in tread or in sidewall)
measureing rim width (looked for something stamped on it but couldn't find it. I am guessing the with by laying a ruler INSIDE of where the tire would be inside the wheel when mounted (call this the freespace between the 2 sidewalls INSIDE when mounted to the rim----make sense????)

And just to let you know.... i'm not a troll or none of that stuff. i'm a middle aged man that doesn't know alot about bike and just have some ideas on how to make this one work for a little different application, thats all.


@gavale, head on over to the kawasaki section, there you'll find more info on your bike in specific.
see above please
 

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see above please
no harm intended with my reply.

actual tyre width can vary eventhough a range of tyres can carry the same size designation which are the numbres you can see on the sidewall of the tyre. that's just how it is because of different tyre construction and other factors. a 160/60 tyre, which should be 160 mm in width according to it's "size", is rarely ever exactly 160 mm wide.

I have run several 16/60 size tyres on the same rim and have kept a small database of actual sizes. the actual width, measured from one edge of the sidewall to the other can vary by up to half an inch. I measured the width like the size is designated on the tyre itself, displayed in this picture:



simple example a 160/60 michelin pilot power mounted on a 5 inch rear Behr wheel measured 170 mm's in width, while a 160/60 dunlop mutant tyre only measured 161 mm. that's a considerable difference eventhough both tyres are supposed to be the same in size, but it's clear they are not. that's what I'm referring to when I say some tyres run thinner than others. 10 mm can be the difference between a tyre clearing the chain and swingarm or hitting them. reason I kept track of this is because a lot of people tend to ask question about wether or not a tyre will work on their bike. rubbing issues and all that can be prevented by running a tyre that's a bit thinner.


about the front. rear and front tyres often have a completely different profile so you can't just take a rear tyre that's a lot wider and taller, and put it on the front of your bike. it will completely ruin the handling and it probably won't even work since room between the fork legs is limited. don't know how else to explain it, you can look around but I can garantee you won't find anyone on here that is running a tyre on the front as big as the one you're planning on putting on your bike.
 

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Thank you for the cross section---definitely helps

no harm intended with my reply.

actual tyre width can vary eventhough a range of tyres can carry the same size designation which are the numbres you can see on the sidewall of the tyre. that's just how it is because of different tyre construction and other factors. a 160/60 tyre, which should be 160 mm in width according to it's "size", is rarely ever exactly 160 mm wide.

I have run several 16/60 size tyres on the same rim and have kept a small database of actual sizes. the actual width, measured from one edge of the sidewall to the other can vary by up to half an inch. I measured the width like the size is designated on the tyre itself, displayed in this picture:



simple example a 160/60 michelin pilot power mounted on a 5 inch rear Behr wheel measured 170 mm's in width, while a 160/60 dunlop mutant tyre only measured 161 mm. that's a considerable difference eventhough both tyres are supposed to be the same in size, but it's clear they are not. that's what I'm referring to when I say some tyres run thinner than others. 10 mm can be the difference between a tyre clearing the chain and swingarm or hitting them. reason I kept track of this is because a lot of people tend to ask question about wether or not a tyre will work on their bike. rubbing issues and all that can be prevented by running a tyre that's a bit thinner.


about the front. rear and front tyres often have a completely different profile so you can't just take a rear tyre that's a lot wider and taller, and put it on the front of your bike. it will completely ruin the handling and it probably won't even work since room between the fork legs is limited. don't know how else to explain it, you can look around but I can garantee you won't find anyone on here that is running a tyre on the front as big as the one you're planning on putting on your bike.

Stick with me here....:coffee:
(That icon needs to show Budweiser)
Where it shows the rim width measurement on the chart......
I measured the rim on the OUTSIDE (on the bike 4"). So allocating 1/4" for the thickness of the aluminum for the rim (probably less), I come up with about 3&1/2" inside the lip. This is just a guess without bustin the tire off.
Then I measure the tire while NOT mounted (in the living room). That dimension is a true 3&7/8" (thats guessing the tire will need to pinch 3/16" each side from its free-standing position).
To me, this is minimal and if not...... please tell me.
Tire sidewall tread location should remain as is and if anything, the diameter may grow just a bit.

Then when measuring the where it says "Tire Width", the dimension of the unmounted tire is 4&5/8" outside to outside.
The dimension between the front forks at the closest point is 5&5/8". Both of these are true and accurate dimensions, so that's 1" difference which should be 1/2" clearance each side. Thats better than in the rear so I am not afraid of expansion from air or heat.

Low mounted fender can be taken off if it doesn't clear or can raise it, or can put a dirt bike fender on under the trees. No big deal on this part.

Now measuring the stock Diablo 120 on the bike--from the rim edge (if you extended the arrow showing Rim Width to the furthest point where the tread would be perpendicular (closest ground contact) it is 2&5/8".
When I take this measurement on the 140 tire, its 3" (this is a pretty good guess where the rim will sit (just a guess).
This is only 3/8" difference on 1/2 the tire.
Only below the axle should affect the steering geomentry if I am guessing right. So I am adding 3/8" to the front end heigth which would change the steering angle.
BUT.... here is the big BUT......
I bought this bike used so I have no idea what was done prior...... I measured the fork tubes in the trees. There are two circular marks around the forks. One is at 3/16" down from the caps, the other is 3/8" down from the caps. Can't go any further down because of the taper.
The trees are actually +15/16" to -7/8" down from the caps depending on which side you measure. That I can adjust correctly when I take the tire off.... no big deal.
To me, it appears the previous owner "dropped the front" / "raised the forks in the trees" about 1/2" to get the bike lower.
From what I am seeing, I will be closer to the factory steering angle (with the extra 1/2" diameter) and on the negative side picking up some unsprung weight.
Other than that, I am also picking up some benefits of the flotation and the traction. It does come with some tradeoffs like more frequent bearing changes, brakes, slower speeds, etc.
I was just curious if anyone had ever done anything like this.
I know this is pretty much a street/ track site. I have also visited with some "dirt guys" on what they think about it.
I know its more custom type stuff and not something that you buy and bolt on, but then again......... the first Sumo had never been done until someone did it, right???:thumbup:

Just looking for all input good, bad, whatever:anim_peep:
 

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if the bike was lowered by the previous owner by simply dropping the forks into the triple clamps and this is of no use to you, set them back to what they are normally positioned at. also, measuring tyres while they're off the rim is not a good reference point to go on. same goes for comparing the dirt to tarmac world, when it comes to tyres there is no way of comparing both directly.

the general stock front rim size on most bikes, including your G650X, is 3,5 inches. that size rim requires 120 front tyres. there's nothing more to it, everything else you said just makes me believe you're overthinking this all a little too much. if you really think you're onto something there's nothing keeping you from mounting the tyre you want to put on, but I can tell you right now without a doubt in my mind that it won't work out the way you planned.

by now I've gone waaaaaaaay offtopic compared to what was asked by the OP so I'm gonne leave it at that.... :anim_peep:
 

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if the bike was lowered by the previous owner by simply dropping the forks into the triple clamps and this is of no use to you, set them back to what they are normally positioned at. also, measuring tyres while they're off the rim is not a good reference point to go on. same goes for comparing the dirt to tarmac world, when it comes to tyres there is no way of comparing both directly.

the general stock front rim size on most bikes, including your G650X, is 3,5 inches. that size rim requires 120 front tyres. there's nothing more to it, everything else you said just makes me believe you're overthinking this all a little too much. if you really think you're onto something there's nothing keeping you from mounting the tyre you want to put on, but I can tell you right now without a doubt in my mind that it won't work out the way you planned.




by now I've gone waaaaaaaay offtopic compared to what was asked by the OP so I'm gonne leave it at that.... :anim_peep:
Absolutely way off topic from what the young man posted initially, definitely didn't mean to jack his thread, sorry for that.
I was just simply looking for some feedback to the afffects that different changes would have.
I think I will try it and see.
Thanks
STR
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Absolutely way off topic from what the young man posted initially, definitely didn't mean to jack his thread, sorry for that.
I was just simply looking for some feedback to the afffects that different changes would have.
I think I will try it and see.
Thanks
STR
lol no problem, in fact I enjoyed reading and learning new stuff, but if I may ask, I want to put a dual purpose tire on my KLX250sf (Anakee, Distanzia, Scorpion, etc), but there isnt for the specific OEM sizes, so What do you recommend I do? I tried to research witch of the 120 was for a 3" Rim but didnt find the info on all tires, could someone help me out?

PS: Not young man, young lady guy in pic is Valentino Rossi ;)
 

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lol no problem, in fact I enjoyed reading and learning new stuff, but if I may ask, I want to put a dual purpose tire on my KLX250sf (Anakee, Distanzia, Scorpion, etc), but there isnt for the specific OEM sizes, so What do you recommend I do? I tried to research witch of the 120 was for a 3" Rim but didnt find the info on all tires, could someone help me out?

PS: Not young man, young lady guy in pic is Valentino Rossi ;)
Well, that answers one question doesn't it.
I had to look up who Valentino Rossi is........ I guess I'm a little out of touch in this age group and lifestyle. :anim_peep:
 
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