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Discussion Starter #1
i just bought a wr450f and there are marks appearing on the rim from my chain hitting it sometimes, there is about 10mm gap from the chain to the rim when bikes sitting. the tyre is a 140 (no idea why prev owner put such a small one on) i assume putting a wider tyre on would make the chain hit that instead but would it eventually just wear down so much that it starts hitting the rim again? also he said when he installed the supermoto rims he had trouble with the spacers and had to use 1 spacer that came with the wheel and one oem spacer that come with the bike factory....could this move the wheel over to one side possibly?
 

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Spacers will move the rim to one side. Also have you checked slack in your chain? Usually the chain will rub on the tire before the rim... I run 160s and get tire rub but it's not an issue and never has been Except for the black "dust" or shaved rubber from the tire lol some people go as far as to trim their tire I've seen...

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okay i noticed the rear lower chain guide plastic is all worn out so i have another one coming hopefully that could be the issue, the tyre is a 140 smaller then most use so im guessing if i had a 150 it would hit tyre not rim
 

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What size rear sprocket do you run? I believe if you go too small you have to modify that chain slide a little by actually cutting q notch out theres a forum around here some where on it but I would person all just get a bigger tire and let it rub the tire if it's not a concern for you. That's how I would run it lol

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i run 42 on rear ...ill have to look for that info. yep i will get a 150 or 160 next but dont want to shell out $200 just now i have to save for a holiday coming up
 

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If your chain is in good condition and adjusted correctly, you can adjust the dishing a bit to reduce rim bite but I don't see much bite on your rim, prob just a loose/worn chain here. Dishing adjustments were common back in the day to reduce bite- I did this back in 2005 to my old CRF450R supermoto to combat chain bite on the rim. start at the valve and work your way around the rim. first loosen the spokes on the chain side 1/4 turn, then tighten all the brake side spokes 1/4 turn. repeat until you're happy. you don't want to pull it too far over though as it starts affecting handling.

keep an eye on your swingarm chain slider too. They wear fast on the street with smaller rear sprockets, and your chain can start grinding through your swingarm
 

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If your chain is in good condition and adjusted correctly, you can adjust the dishing a bit to reduce rim bite but I don't see much bite on your rim, prob just a loose/worn chain here. Dishing adjustments were common back in the day to reduce bite- I did this back in 2005 to my old CRF450R supermoto to combat chain bite on the rim. start at the valve and work your way around the rim. first loosen the spokes on the chain side 1/4 turn, then tighten all the brake side spokes 1/4 turn. repeat until you're happy. you don't want to pull it too far over though as it starts affecting handling.

keep an eye on your swingarm chain slider too. They wear fast on the street with smaller rear sprockets, and your chain can start grinding through your swingarm
Two strokes need to be ridden differently then the 450 four strokes. That being said, yes, a 300 could be plenty competitive.
 

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If your chain is in good condition and adjusted correctly, you can adjust the dishing a bit to reduce rim bite but I don't see much bite on your rim, prob just a loose/worn chain here. Dishing adjustments were common back in the day to reduce bite- I did this back in 2005 to my old CRF450R supermoto to combat chain bite on the rim. start at the valve and work your way around the rim. first loosen the spokes on the chain side 1/4 turn, then tighten all the brake side spokes 1/4 turn. repeat until you're happy. you don't want to pull it too far over though as it starts affecting handling.

keep an eye on your swingarm chain slider too. They wear fast on the street with smaller rear sprockets, and your chain can start grinding through your swingarm
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