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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Very new to the supermoto thing. Just happened to see one on the Kawasaki web site the KLX 250 SF. That is all it took for me to start looking at everything i possible can. Then I found this website. Kick ass! But anyway I was curious to which would be good for the complete n00b. I know this is a questions that has been asked many times, but its not my main question. The main is what is the best tools to get to be able to do anything to the bike. And lets pretend that I have albsolutely no tools as is. Thanx for the help ahead of time. Ohh also I'll will be cruising the site for the next 6 months or so till I get back to the states from Operation Afghanistan Suck.
 

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:welcome: to SMJ. Good luck searching for a new ride.:D
 

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The whole time I was reading your post I was thinking... "Man, this is pretty good grammar for a Haji *******..."

Then I saw that you're an American :rofl:

Welcome!
 

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WR250X

Very low maintenance (valve checks are 23k mile intervals if I remember right), very high fun, sips fuel (unless you ride it WOT in 4th gear up the Rocky mtns all the time like I did with mine), EFI, tons of parts available if you do get some tools. But if you weigh over 215-ish pounds, then get something with more CCs. Personally, I don't think that the KTM 690 SMC is too much for anyone except maybe someone who has never ridden a motorcycle at all before but I haven't ridden a Husky or Aprilia either. I have ridden a DRZ, not a bad bike to go with and you can find them cheap. How's that for narrowing it down?:lol:

I got back from Kandahar (FOB Ramrod) last January and I perused this site pretty much every chance I got (That was when my SuMo addiction started). There's a ton of information available here and the people are very helpful, good luck with the search.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The whole time I was reading your post I was thinking... "Man, this is pretty good grammar for a Haji *******..."

Then I saw that you're an American :rofl:

Welcome!
LOL the taliban teaches english very well.....oh and beating your 8 year old wife. They are good at that too
 

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Welcome to SMJ dude:welcome:I sold my CR 480 many moons ago when I joined the Navy, what a dumbass. Whatever you get, you will love it. Awesome fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanx to all that have replyed, what sucks is near my house is a KTM/Husaberg dealership and I think all those bikes are out of my skill level. Being the guy how rode everyones bike and ATV while not having one of his own, leaves me with alot to learn. Plus Im a rather skinny person. At 6'2ish and 160 dripping wet. So my thinking is anything over 400cc is outa my skill level.:hmmm:
 

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Coin is always a factor unless you got a rich uncle:lol:Just look for a fair deal and you can always sell it and upgrade later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Coin is always a factor unless you got a rich uncle:lol:Just look for a fair deal and you can always sell it and upgrade later.
Coin is a factor but Ill be getting home with a pocket full of deployment money. About 10 large is my top end budget. I would rather get something that I can grow into if need be, that wont scare the stool out of me in the beggining And wife already said the word that I could get a "dirt bike" so she doesnt need to know any details on my supermoto mistress LOL.
 

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I always suggest to people starting out riding dirt to start small and work into a larger bike. Could someone get on a larger cc bike and learn? Hell yeah I did it learning on my friend's 89 xl650r with a bald back tire. It just requires a lot more careful execution of the skills you have to develop over time like working the controls in normal and oh shit situations to control the bike and prevent injury. You can still bust a$$ just as hard on a smaller bike so whatever you get spend a lot of time building your skills. The more you learn the more fun you can have. You can always sell the smaller bike when you want more power and are sure you are going to stay interested in the hobby/lifestyle of riding motorcycles.

Most of us throw together a toolkit to ride dirt and sumo and carry it on the bike or in a bag. I carry bare essentials tools that I've used to work on the bike with at home just to be sure I could use them in the event I need too while out riding. MSR sells fanny pack bags with all the tools you would need curbside/trailside to try and get home in the event of a problem but having a better tool system at home is good for more major maintenance tasks as you learn more about the bike to save some money.

I suggest you get a bike like mentioned above that will be low maintenance and get a multi-tool made for working on bikes or msr kit and use those tools as you have to work on your bike to see what else you find you need to work on the bike and meet your comfort level. There is some great threads on thumpertalk as well regarding putting together a good toolkit for specific models of bikes you may want to check out.

NOTHING will be worth carrying if you don't get your regular maintenance tasks done before you ride so you can comfortably go out and enjoy yourself and keep the bike running reliably.
 
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