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Discussion Starter #1
Well I finally picked up a 2007 DRZ. It should be a pretty big change from the sportbikes I've always ridden. Not that I said "should". That's right, I can't even ride it yet. I'm only 5'5" (120 lbs), so I should probably find a way to touch the ground before I wreck the thing.

I've been doing my research, and I know of a few ways to get the bike lower. I'm thinking about buying some Kouba links, and hopefully find some nice risers so i can lower the front down more than 0.5" on the tripple clamps. I'll probably also get the Gel Seat to get as low as I can.

Here are my questions...

1) Kouba makes 3 levels of "drop" for this bike. The biggest drop is 1.75". That's really going to change the suspension geometry. Is that too much? Should I stick with the 1.25" drop, or maybe even the 0.75"?

2) Anyone have a good recommendation for risers? I know I can drop the bike about 0.5", but I'd really like to match the drop in the rear as much as possible.

3) Does the Gel Seat suck?

Don't know hoe to attach the images of my new toy, but it's the black model with the led tail light kit. Everything else is stock...
 

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i got a buddy that is damn short and tippy toes the damn thing, i wouldnt lower itmy self,i would first try to lower the seat. from what i have heard the gel seat sucks although it doeslower the seat height as much as an 1", ive also heard the corbin is low but hard as hell on the arse.im short my self although im 175 but try to shave your stock foam down and see if your able to touch with your toes
 

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5'7" isn't that short. The seat might do it. remember with the suspension compressed with your weight it's an inch or 2 lower, and you really don't need to have 2 feet on the ground.

Lowering should only be a last resort unless your a busa squid. You could try dropping the front some without any additional parts right now. Don't go to far or you will found the bike too eager to change direction.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, about 2 minutes after my post, i couldn't contain myself. I had to go outside and see if it was at all possible to ride the thing. I'm definitely on the very tips of my toes if I'm trying to put both feet down. I was able to shift over to the right foot to get the kickstand up. Basically, to be able to put 1 food down flat, I have to basically shift myself all the way over.

Anyway, I was able to ride the thing up and down the street a couple times, and the thing seems like it's gonna be a blast to ride. I think I'll feel much more comfortable if I can get the thing down a couple inches. I might just go with the 3/4" lowering link, lower the front down on the triple clamps, and go for the gel seat.

The problem is that I'm so freakin light that I can barely even compress the suspension with my weight. That might be a good reason to crank down the pre-load on the rear a little bit (am I wrong?).

Still gonna look into the best way to get it a little lower, but I don't think I need to lower it as much as I thought before.....
 

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I am really not that tall either, about 5'6" with shoes. The first thing I did was take the stock seat cover off and shave a bunch of the seat foam off the stock seat. It lowered it considerably, and I dont have any comfort issues. When I come to a stop I usually slide off the right side and flat foot my right foot and have my left dangle. If I stand centered on the seat I barely tip toe on each side, which was hard at first but Ive gotten used to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would do the gel seat first. If that works out, you can keep stock geometry, which would be best.
That's pretty much the plan at this point. I found a good deal on the seat and 1 1/8" lowering links. I'll go with the seat first, and see how it is, but I have a feeling, I'm going to end up throwing the links on there anyway. If I do that, I'll drop the front a little bit to try to keep the geometry as close to stock as possible. In the end, the rear will probably be about 0.6" lower than the front relative to the stock configuration. Taking my weight (or lack thereof) into consideration, the sag will be very minimal.

If I feel fine without the seat, I'll probably just try to sell the links. I guess we'll see. I wish I had a helmet right now! Won't be here for a couple days.
 

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Try shaving the stock seat first is the cheapest way. I'm also 5'5" 150lbs and at first I could tip toe only one foot at a time. After getting the seat shaved 1.5 inches I could flat foot one foot at a time and thats all you need while at stops.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
i say just get used to it. being able to touch one foot down is enough IMO. i'm the same way on my smc. but i have been riding dirt for years on and off so i guess i'm used to it too.
I could get use to it, but I'm really not close enough to the ground to be safe (from a tip over). I'm really on the very tips of my toes if I try to touch on both sides. That means, to put the kickstand up I have to get on, get the bike level, shift off to the right to get the stand up, shift back to both, then shift to the left.....damn, I forgot to put it in gear. Hang on, let me inch over again, lol.

I bought this thing so it would be easier to deal with than the sportbikes I've previously owned (plus supermoto is kicka$$). I think I can give up an inch of clearance and swap out the seat in exchange for a bike that's truly easy to ride.

We'll see though. I'm just gonna start with the seat, and see how much that actually buys me. Maybe it will be good enough. I have to ride it to work in stock form on Wednesday. That should be interesting. :bike:
 

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Hi ive just fitted koubalink 1.25 and lowered the forks to the screw limit on the top of the forks (no raisers). Im 5 ft 6 and it has made the world of diference! If you cut the seat you may have problems selling it later to anyone tall and it makes the seating cramped ( i think) Gel seats and crbins etc are expensive too. The handling is slightly more stable at higher speeds, but slightly less agressive at lower speeds, all in all a good buy.
 

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just get used to putting one foot down. it's not that big of a deal. once you get some seat time under your belt you'll look back a laugh at yourself for being such a sally. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
just get used to putting one foot down. it's not that big of a deal. once you get some seat time under your belt you'll look back a laugh at yourself for being such a sally. :lol:
I don't think you truly understand me here. This is the 4th bike I've owned and I've been riding for over 8 years. Needless to say I have a pretty good idea about when I'm not safe on a bike. I've been riding the DRZ quite a bit since I bought it, and I know I'm not "just going to get use to it."

I ALWAYS only stop on one foot because I actually use my back brake, but I still need to be able to switch over to pop it out of gear if I'm going to be stuck at a light for a while, etc.

You have to realize that I'm not just stopping on one foot with this bike. I can only reach the ground with the ball of that one foot. If I happen to be on a street that slopes to the left, I have even less to work with. I'm literally on my toes on that one foot. Now try holding up a bike that weighs 3x as much as you while holding the clutch and front brake (because I can't even reach the rear brake at this point) through a full stoplight cycle.....then go 200ft and do it again....and again.

I bought this bike because it's supposed to be easy to ride. I'm gonna do whatever it takes to actually make that true in my case. I've already ordered the lowering links and gel seat, so we'll see if that helps.....
 
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