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Looking for a little knowledge on getting my CR85 ready to supermoto. I bought a new CR85 back in October and have a ton of fun with it in the dirt but I have a track that I can moto it not to far from here. I got a set of 17" wheels and a couple of pull off 120/70/17's from my ole SV650 to put on it. What else do I need to do for getting the suspension right? Not looking to spend a bunch of money.

Thanks, maxw_ll
 

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Standard sm set-up is going to typically going to be stiffer springs front and rear which you can get from race tech for your weight for about 190 bucks.(front and rear) depending on width of 17s you can run mini gp tires(You might not ever get heat in those sv tires because of the thicker carcass). Other than that its up to you but thats the basics. You can run larger front rotor, caliper upgrades, power mods as you go. If you haven't already, for sure get a pipe, jet kit and reed valve which smooths out that peaky powerband the cr has.
 

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"If you haven't already, for sure get a pipe, jet kit and reed valve which smooths out that peaky powerband the cr has."

Can you tell me more about which pipe, jet, and reed valve I need to run to smooth out the peaky powerband?
 

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i had a 03 CR85 and it was indeed rather 'abrupt' in power delivery but not terrible.
the '05 and up were much, much better. my meager .02 ?

don't sweat the engine for now- work on wheels and some suspension mods.
ride/race it and see where you feel tuning need be done.

what width rims did you get?
 

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This is true. I failed to see the "new" which I'm assuming mean brand new? You can check this out. However if you feel the powerband is a bit too snappy you can fix most of it with the reed kit.

Are you gonna do mostly small tight tracks or more open stuff like on big road race tracks?



These guys must be pretty good. They have a pretty good rep. Give them a call
http://www.mmracing.biz/cr85 build.htm

And then just cause its fun to shop.
http://store.mototassinari.com/product_info.php?cPath=1_17&products_id=28

http://www.fmfracing.com/products/catalog.aspx?CategoryID=74&ItemID=021047

http://www.fmfracing.com/products/catalog.aspx?CategoryID=77

http://www.marchesiniwheels.com/ENG/Supermotard/
 

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You need to have a expert (big wheel version) to put 17" wheels on an cr85.

The small wheel version the tire will hit tread on front or you wont be able to get your chain tight enough.

There is a set of 12" for sale in classifieds
 

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i had a 03 CR85 and it was indeed rather 'abrupt' in power delivery but not terrible.
the '05 and up were much, much better. my meager .02 ?
You're right and that was partially because of the round-slide carburetor. In '05, Honda started using the Keihin PWK28, flat-slide carburetor.

As for the original topic, brakes, suspension and handling are top priorities. A good suspension set-up will get you better lap times and a better braking set-up will get you far deeper into the corners. Stiffer springs will get you started on the track, but realistically, the shock needs to be revalved and the front-end should be converted to a cartridge system. Sort those out first, then tinker with the engine.

Time and time again, I've seen guys with a well sorted suspension show the guys with a well sorted engine the fast line around the track.

Also, using a set of warmers on a set of GP slicks is mandatory. No amount of warm-up laps will soak the carcass with enough heat to make them stick and conform to the asphalt properly. As it stands, it takes 30-45 minutes at 170 degrees to completely heat them with warmers.
 

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brake? i have a bolt-on big brake set up for sale.i say big actually it uses the stock rotor but it works pretty good- for the money. it consist of a stock CR/CRF master cyl. Goodridge hose, twin piston Nissin caliper,EBC MXS pads with a Applied Racing adapter bracket. fits CR's and 150R's ready to bolt on and stop...200 shipped.
 

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I'm running v-force reeds, fmf rev pipe, and a shorty silencer. I have no idea what it was like stock, but it still wants to bring the front wheel up on the pipe. I think it's more fun that way, but i wouldn't call it abrupt.

Mookie is also right that you have to do something about the brakes. I'm about to do the crf brake conversion myself. $200 is a good price, I spent more than that piecing it together.
 

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same thing but yellow...

I'm right now doing the same thing with RM85. Will use 17s and Dunlop 125 slicks it sounds like. Do you really need tire warmers? that really adds a level of ass pain i hoped to avoid entirely. Can you get them hot just by running low psi?
 

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Yes, you definitely need warmers. Unfortunately, you also need a generator to power the warmers. Yes, a complete pain in the ass and more money than most want to spend to get started, but definitely worth it to have access to "real" GP rubber.
 

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I'm right now doing the same thing with RM85. Will use 17s and Dunlop 125 slicks it sounds like. Do you really need tire warmers? that really adds a level of ass pain i hoped to avoid entirely. Can you get them hot just by running low psi?
I wouldn't really say you have to have them. We ran an entire season(sprints and endurance) on 2 pair of Bridgestone supersoft GP's and never used tire warmers. It depends on your comfort level. I don't mind going and sliding the bike around for a few corners till the tires get warm. My teammate..... not so much. Try it and see. Motards are so light that you usually don't really need warmers.
 

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also- it depends some too on the level at which you race and the competition.
IF your running in the top 5- and the other 4 in front of you are going to the grid with tires that are ready to do battle from the green flag. then yes- you need to be on the same playing field.

and of course tires warmed are better than cold ones but like motofaction says-
tires warm pretty quickly, especially with the low static pressures we typically use- 18 to 20 cold.
on a sunny day move the bikes tires facing the sun on whatever side you'll turn the most usually left and let mother nature warm em up.
 
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