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Question to all you street tarders. What's the best body position when riding through the faster street sweepers - hang-off roadrace style, not foot down MX style - sit forward towards the tank, or more towards the rear?

Reason I ask is that I'm coming to sumos from liter plus sport-tourers, and since I'm on the light side (5'8", 152#), I've always felt the need to get my body weight as far back as possible in spirited twisty riding to balance the weight of the engine which tends to have significant forward bias on sport-tourers.

Now, looking at the light weight engine of a sumo and it's reasonably centered position between the wheels, I kind of feel like I should be sitting right up on the tank with my CoG right on top of the pegs.

Is that right - sit forward for the spirited twisties?
 

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Sit near the front of the seat, feet on the pegs. Lean the bike, lean with the bike. You can lean off if you want, but the best place for your feet is on the pegs. At least that's how I ride it on a fast sweeper, with the exception of leaning off.

Start there and adjust for your style and preference.

Your mileage may vary. Void where prohibited by law. Discontinue use if rash develops or continues.
 

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Pretty much what MXcat said. I sit roughly centered over the pegs, which is a little forward I guess. Feet up on the pegs, last thing you want is your heel diggin in at high speed. Bike leaned over with you at the same angle, unless you prefer to be knee down style. Look as far through the corner as you can, and enjoy the ride.
 

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This is a great question. I've wondered the same thing myself and have found that I can make the bike turn/lean effortlessly by sitting forward on the seat and leaning my opposite leg into the tank. So for a left hander,my right leg pushes on the tank and vise versa. The bike drops into the turn and my ass kinda rides on the side of the seat. So that the bike is leaning over more than I am. Works for me. Anyone else do this?
 

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This is a great question. I've wondered the same thing myself and have found that I can make the bike turn/lean effortlessly by sitting forward on the seat and leaning my opposite leg into the tank. So for a left hander,my right leg pushes on the tank and vise versa. The bike drops into the turn and my ass kinda rides on the side of the seat. So that the bike is leaning over more than I am. Works for me. Anyone else do this?
thats kindof how i do it as well.. but im also new to sumo and came from street bikes so the whole ass on the side is more comfy for me
 

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i sit up front because it feels right. knee down works-so does bending the bike under you while body stays vertical. it all works with these things. even changing lines mid corner. lots of choices keep it interesting.
 

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So for a left hander,my right leg pushes on the tank and vise versa. The bike drops into the turn and my ass kinda rides on the side of the seat. So that the bike is leaning over more than I am.
You're on the right track, but I think it'll get you into trouble. As you get faster, you'll lean the bike more and more--eventually, you'll run out of tire. The reason you want to stay upright on the bike (or hang off the inside) is to keep the tire as upright as possible, giving you a larger contact patch. Leaning off the inside also helps prevent highsides.

Try weighting the inside peg and leaning with the bike. It'll drop right in like you describe, but now you have more tire to work with. Adjust your line out of the turn with outside leg pressure on the tank.
 

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If anything bias your seating position/weight towards the front tire.

All of my lowside crashes have resulted from sitting in the middle/back of the seat and powering thru/out of the corner. When on the gas the front wheel tends to get light and potentially lose traction.

Git yer weight forward, especially in the turns, to keep some weight on the front in order to maintain traction.
 

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If anything bias your seating position/weight towards the front tire.

All of my lowside crashes have resulted from sitting in the middle/back of the seat and powering thru/out of the corner. When on the gas the front wheel tends to get light and potentially lose traction.

Git yer weight forward, especially in the turns, to keep some weight on the front in order to maintain traction.
+1,000

i can verify this from experience.

personally, i like to ride foot out in slow corners, roadrace style in faster ones. when i ride foot out, i try to do it more flat track style than dirt and sumo-style. this way, my foot more skims the track, rather than has a chance a dig in.

please note: i suck at supermoto, so take my words with a grain of salt.
 

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i ride sorta RR style on the sumo. i hang off the inside of the bike more than i probably need to. i haven't used my rear tire edge to edge yet and i blame that on hanging off to much. i also move forward a bit on the seat if i am going to use a high lean angle, especially on this bike because the gas tank is behind me making the front a little light.

i will never feel right taking a foot off the pegs in a fast corner. i keep my feet planted on the pegs at all times.
 

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This is a great question. I've wondered the same thing myself and have found that I can make the bike turn/lean effortlessly by sitting forward on the seat and leaning my opposite leg into the tank. So for a left hander,my right leg pushes on the tank and vise versa. The bike drops into the turn and my ass kinda rides on the side of the seat. So that the bike is leaning over more than I am. Works for me. Anyone else do this?
+1, I'm always moving around
 

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You won't run out of tire on a supermoto bike. You might run out of talent, but you won't run out of tire. Due to the architecture of the supermoto bike you need to get your weight far forward. This is why I don't ride RR style (and that is the back ground from which I come). I get forward on the bike, then I bend my elbows and hunch over the handle bars as much as possible. I have been known to drag my foot (boot out, DT style) at 75-80 mph too. Considering an SM won't go much over 100, you are not likely to encounter truly fast sweepers on an SM.
 

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I've noticed some riders using the 'SM foot' as a mental crutch. Your foot generally has about as much to do sticking out there as the guys who leave both feet down 15-20 ft after leaving the stoplight. The only time that thing should leave the peg on the street is when

1. Your toe would otherwise be dragging against the ground, given the nature of dirtbike ergos

2. You need to stretch your knee

3. You're sliding deeply into a hairpin turn, as lowside insurance and because of (1.)

4. Playing motorcycle polo

5. You're doing a rear brake hockey stop U-turn before wheelie-ing with a machine gun spraying rounds and yelling. Someone please illustrate.

Less is more. Stay upright, weight forward, feet on pegs, and lean to the inside of a turn if it's fast and low and you need to keep ground clearance. The only time you should be leaning AWAY from the turn is when you're doing a slow U-turn, MSF course, gymkhana etc., as it compromises clearance. I agree with the above poster that your balls will shrivel up before you run out of tire, but it pays to have better habits when they do ripen.

One more opinion... the distance from the peg to the bikes pivot axis and your weight do not create enough of a moment to counter the gyroscope of your wheels above 15 mph. Don't think about 'weighting' either peg, steer with your handlebars.
 

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if its a slow corner i have my foot down, but anything over about 45 i have my foot up, but still sit more mx style, parallel with the bike, but without my foot out. it probably looks funny, but it works for me.

and as far as position on the seat, i sit about as far forward as possible. right up against the back of the tank. everyone thinks it looks goofy, but its whats comfortable for me.
 

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One more opinion... the distance from the peg to the bikes pivot axis and your weight do not create enough of a moment to counter the gyroscope of your wheels above 15 mph. Don't think about 'weighting' either peg, steer with your handlebars.
Amen to that brother! :bowdown:

Weighting the pegs to steer does work to some degree, but it is not sound technique IMO. If you watch Moto GP and WSBK, those guys usually have their foot off the peg at turn in most of the time. I think they know a little something about steering a motorcycle. :D
 

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If you watch Moto GP and WSBK, those guys usually have their foot off the peg at turn in most of the time. I think they know a little something about steering a motorcycle. :D
It's their outside foot that's loose, no? (Real question, as I haven't checked for loose feet besides deep in the corner.) If so, they're weighting the inside.
 

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It's their outside foot that's loose, no? (Real question, as I haven't checked for loose feet besides deep in the corner.) If so, they're weighting the inside.
no
he's talking about the them downshifting, then taking their foot completely off the peg to reposition it properly for the turn. at this point they're already leaned over a good amount. Rossi, Pedro, Bayliss.... quite a few of them do it
 

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no
he's talking about the them downshifting, then taking their foot completely off the peg to reposition it properly for the turn. at this point they're already leaned over a good amount. Rossi, Pedro, Bayliss.... quite a few of them do it
:thumbup:

You really should be thinking about only 2 things: 1. how far can you look up the road or track, 2. push or pull on the handlebars. If you are sitting in the proper position, there is nothing else to think about, well except maybe how hard you can pull the trigger.

If you spend some time riding off road, you come to realize that the throttle is all that really matters. :D
 
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