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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just can't seem to hear the difference in the cam chain noise when tuning the MCCT, and every time I think I do, I lose it, so I'm going back to the ACCT for a while. Has anyone put lots of miles on an ACCT? I know the current version is supposed to be pretty good, maybe not as good as a properly set MCCT, but still.

I just wanna ride, and having that doubt, if I set it right or not, in the back of my mind is gonna drive me crazy!
 

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I have 9000 on the stock one. no problems, if you call 9000 high mileage its an 09 also. hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
9k's not too high, I was thinking 20-30k. It is good to hear though. I'm gonna put it back on in the morning and take my new mods for the test ride they deserve!:arsenal
 

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Almost 40,000 miles on mine. Not one issue. :thumbup:
The old style ACCT, I'm pretty sure, was unique to the DRZ. The new style one was originally designed for the 'Busa. Suzuki just borrowed that one to fix the failure issues they had seen on the old ones. Bob's your uncle... no problems. Have you ever heard of a Hayabusa loosing it's motor because of a cam chain tensioner? Neither have I.
 

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Ah, good to know. Now I feel much better!:thumbup: If it can stand up to a 'Busa I'm sure it can stand up to anything my DRZ could throw at it.
 

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I would like to know this also.
I have 15k on my '08 is that after the "improvement"?
 

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I'm pretty sure I read the years that are most at risk at having an acct issue is 00-03. Don't quote me on that though, I just knows its the early models.

The risks with the acct are the tensioner over tightening and snapping and the cam chain running loose, and/or premature cam chain wear due to stretching.

For the price and ease of installation I highly recommend it. For me it was worth the piece of mind and it will maximize the life of my cam chain. Just try and think about how the acct works compared to the mcct. If you have never popped your valve cover off you should do so even just to take a look and learn how it works. I find that kind of thing very interesting.

I'd describe the noise when it is too loose as sounding like hitting an empty pop can. When that goes away its good. Set it and forget it! :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm pretty sure I read the years that are most at risk at having an acct issue is 00-03. Don't quote me on that though, I just knows its the early models.

The risks with the acct are the tensioner over tightening and snapping and the cam chain running loose, and/or premature cam chain wear due to stretching.

For the price and ease of installation I highly recommend it. For me it was worth the piece of mind and it will maximize the life of my cam chain. Just try and think about how the acct works compared to the mcct. If you have never popped your valve cover off you should do so even just to take a look and learn how it works. I find that kind of thing very interesting.

I'd describe the noise when it is too loose as sounding like hitting an empty pop can. When that goes away its good. Set it and forget it! :thumbup:
I had just installed the new cams and I wasn't sure if what I was hearing was the new 'normal cam noise' or 'too lose/tight' MCCT sound. It was stressing me out, so I put the stocker back in.
 

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Hotcams made my valves noticeably louder. But if it makes you comfortable, run the acct for awhile and when you learn the sound take another shot at the mcct. For some reason I remember being able to hear the noises easier (more clearly) with stock cams when adjusting the mcct.
 

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I think Burned has an MCCT adjusting tutorial thread on Thumpertalk, but I'm not 100% on that.
2003 was the change over year for the 'Busa type ACCT.

Hijack
Shanx, what is up, man? Are you finally coming out to the track, this year, or what? :arsenal
 

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Haha I'd love to hit the track but I don't think its going to happen this year. I'd need some leather pants and I already spent my moto money this summer on cams and bb! :thumbup:

I want to get more group rides together this season, and hit Ganaraksa, then maybe next summer I'll focus on making it out to the track.
 

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I just can't seem to hear the difference in the cam chain noise when tuning the MCCT, and every time I think I do, I lose it, so I'm going back to the ACCT for a while. Has anyone put lots of miles on an ACCT? I know the current version is supposed to be pretty good, maybe not as good as a properly set MCCT, but still.

I just wanna ride, and having that doubt, if I set it right or not, in the back of my mind is gonna drive me crazy!
Here is the instruction I send with my cam chain tensioners with some minor modifications for it to work in this forum:



KLX 650/DRz400 Manual Cam Chain Tensioner



Installing the new manual cam chain tensioner:

You will need a pair of 13mm wrenches, a pair of needle nose pliers, a 4mm hex key (allen head) wrench or socket, ratchet, inch/lb torque wrench, gasket sealer (Hondabond, Yamabond, etc.), an appropriate size socket/ratchet to turn over the engine.

Remove the “automatic” tensioner body from the motor by removing the two small bolts.

Remove the large plastic screw plug in the right side alternator cover. See the “magic tool” in the photos.

Back the adjustment bolt out a fair amount on the new tensioner and remove the plastic sleeves from the mount bolts

Put some Yamabond (Hondabond, Kawabond – whatever bond) sealant or a similar goop on the tensioner gasket. I don’t know for sure, but even grease may work fine.

Install the tensioner in place threading in the supplied countersunk bolts.
NOTE: Be sure to install the tensioner with the adjuster bolt offset BELOW horizontal center - see photo..

Torque the bolts to 72 in/lb (6 ft/lb or 8 N/m) if you wish..

Turn the adjuster bolt in as far as possible by hand.

Using 17 mm socket and ratchet,

A) From the left side, rotate the crank shaft slowly counterclockwise, (from the right side rotate the crank shaft slowly clockwise) which will pull the cam chain taut on the drive side making the tensioner side slack, while turning the tensioner adjustment screw by hand. DO NOT spin the motor over with the starter, you risk jumping cam timing or possible valve damage due to excess chain slack. Do not force the crank if it should hit something solid, you do NOT want to damage a valve. Do not turn the engine over with the starter, that could also result in valve damage.



B) Turn the motor over for a few revolutions with the ratchet while applying pressure by hand, the tensioner bolt will turn in easily when taking up slack in the chain, but will resist turning when either the chain is under tension (turning the crank the wrong way) or when the slack has been taken up.

C) You should be able to tell when the slack is gone, the bolt will no longer turn easily.

D) Back off 1/6 turn (one flat of the acorn nut).

E) Using one 13mm wrench tighten the tensioner locking nut down tight holding the acorn nut with the other 13mm wrench to keep the adjuster bolt from turning.. The acorn is loctited in place and should not move.

F) Rotate the crank slowly over again to make sure valves are not out of time and hitting the piston,.​
Start the engine and warm it up to operating temperature.

With the engine running:

A) Loosen the locking nut and the tensioner bolt enough to hear the cam chains rattle.

B) Gently finger-tighten the tensioner bolt until there is no detectable rattle.

C) Back out the tensioner bolt slightly until there is detectable light rattle (listen very carefully, this is extra-fine tuning to make sure you don't over tighten)

D) Tighten the tensioner bolt back in slightly (about 1/8 turn or less) until rattle is gone. [If you can not seem to hear any rattle, finger-tighten the bolt, that should be sufficient.]

E) Tighten the locking nut while holding the tensioner acorn nut in place with a wrench to keep the bolt from turning.​

This works without gimmicks and guesswork that can over tighten the chains or let them flail around in the cases. Re-adjust every several thousand miles or if you hear the rattle of cam chains again. I think I’ve only done about 4 adjustments over the past 30,000 miles using the “sound” method on the KLX. I’ve not done the finger-tighten method on the KLX because it is just as easy to go by sound. If my hearing goes, I may change that. The key point is what the tensioner does – it simply takes up excess slack so the chains don’t slap around and wear prematurely. There is no preloading necessary.



You may want to wear gloves since the tensioner bolt gets very hot. I lightly use a wrench, due to the hot bolt, but very lightly holding the wrench by the head so as to not put pressure on the wrench.

While doing a tensioner on a Kawasaki Eliminator found that the finger tightening method also revealed the fact that you can actually feel a tapping on the adjuster bolt that coincides with the ticking noise. It is the cam chain slapping against the slider which taps on the adjuster bolt. As you adjust the ticking out the tappng disappears too. When gone, lock down the lock nut and you have as perfect adjustment as can be had.

The key point is to have NO TENSION on the cam chain and NO TICKING of the cam drive. All you are doing is adjusting all the play out of the cam chain. If it has tension on the drive, depending on how much is exerted it will wear out the slider and chain faster and possibly bind the cams to an extent in the bearing surface of the head and possibly cause damage to the bearing surfaces.

It is a simple adjustment and I've only had three or four out of about 300 people worldwide (18 countries and about 40 US states) that have had any issue and once I got them to quit overtightening the tensioner all was well. I actually helped one rider real-time as he did the adjustment while on his cell phone. The ticking he was hearing was the Kawasaki reed valve pollution system on the top of his 900, not the cam drive.

I will tell you the cam drive will tick lightly when at cold start, that is simply a bit of play that must be there to allow for thermal expansion of the engine parts. The ticking will go away as the engine gets hot. Follow the instructions and you'll have no noise when at operating temperature and no risk of damaging the cam drive.

Mark Krieger
www.kriegercamchaintensioners.com

Do I know what I'm talking about? Check... some may require membership to view.

http://forum.concours.org/index.php?topic=73566.0 membership required.

http://kawasakiforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=33165

http://www.kawasakiforums.com/forum/klx-250s-71/diving-into-cam-chain-issue-33527/

http://kawasakiforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=33669

http://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/main-lobby/133505-krieger-cam-chain-tensioner-review.html

http://www.zl-oa.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12833&highlight=Krieger

Want to see the kit and installation in a KLX250 here it is:



The kits include fasteners, gasket, instructions, and stickers much as I would want. The KLX250 uses an allen nut and jam nut because of the close proximity of the exhaust. Others use an acorn nut with a jam nut.

I've only sent out I think 4 DRz tensioners versus maybe about 100 KLX650 tensioners. Seems the DRz guys are happy paying $15-20 more for them than I charge, but that's life I guess. Not a huge deal, I'm an industrial tech teacher and this is a sideline for fun. I started because the major maker of them ignored my request for one with a longer bolt for my Zephyr so when I made one I made four and sold them on the Zephyr Zone and Yahoo KLX650 group. It was fun and I made them in such a fashion I could sell for $30 and shipping. That made for world appeal since it is only $13.95 to ship around the world.
 

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Almost 40,000 miles on mine. Not one issue. :thumbup:
The old style ACCT, I'm pretty sure, was unique to the DRZ. The new style one was originally designed for the 'Busa. Suzuki just borrowed that one to fix the failure issues they had seen on the old ones. Bob's your uncle... no problems. Have you ever heard of a Hayabusa loosing it's motor because of a cam chain tensioner? Neither have I.
No I haven't, but I've heard of KLX650s having premature cam chain wear when the ratchet system similar to the DRz fails. Not all of them fail. It has to do with the fact that the seating in of the cam chain and the wear is dynamic but the cam chain tensioner adjusts in increments and also will have machining tolerance stacking come into play too. If the wear is at the right point the ratchet pawl will just start over the top of the rack gear tooth, but not seat. Then when the cam drive snatches under harder deceleration the rack will push back and snap the pawl over the top of the tooth, nicking the edges of both parts.

This will happen over and over until the backlash is easy enough to allow it to snap quickly enough to go over another tooth and even as many as four teeth. I was working as a quality engineer when I had to redo the top end of my KLX for the ruined cam chains and I noticed this wear when looking at what appeared to be a good tensioner that just wasn't working.

That explains why some fail and others do not. Same happens with the Kawasaki and some Suzuki road bikes. Like I said, I ended up selling about 300 tensioners in roughly two years because of the problems others had and what had been said in various forums about the tensioners I make and the value for the money spent. I wouldn't be doing this if another company had made the part I needed. But it's been fun.

From what I understand with the 'Busa, it also uses additional pressure from the oiling system to hold in on the cam chain tensioner plunger. That's the problem for high performance 'Busas. It's too much pressure and wears things out. So they go to a manual tensoner on the high performance ones. Seems a lot of MX bike builders do manual tensoners too, as do most road racers. Failure isn't an option they can afford. They go for simplicity that works invariably. A manual tensioner is just that.

Be glad you don't have a Honda VTR1000 Superhawk/FireStorm, they have catastrophic failure of the front cylinder tensioner. Those guys are replacing the parts before they fail because if they do fail frequently it takes out at least a few valves and can destroy a head. Yours and mine only slowly fail, if they do you have a thousand or so miles before it's really bad. That HyVo style chain should last the life of the engine, but if it's allowed to slap around in there it will wear out and possibly damage parts.
 
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